Open Access Journal on Clinical Diabetes and Endocrinology

Screen Shot 2014-10-08 at 2.01.15 PM

Through a unique publishing collaboration, the University of Michigan and BioMed Central have launched a new open access journal, Clinical Diabetes and Endocrinology, which is now seeking submissions and set to begin publishing in the first quarter of 2015. The journal is led by Editor-in-Chief Meng H. Tan, Professor of Internal Medicine in the Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology, and Diabetes at the University of Michigan.

Dr. Tan states, “Clinical Diabetes and Endocrinology aims to promote better care for people with diabetes and endocrine diseases by sharing with their health professionals new research and clinical knowledge on various aspects of their diseases. This collaborative academic-private initiative will make the new knowledge readily, freely, and immediately accessible to these health professionals worldwide so it can have a global impact.”

Jasna Markovac, Senior Director, Learning Design and Publishingor Medical School Information Services (MSIS), explains, “The University of Michigan has a history of emphasizing the importance of open scholarship, open access, and open publishing. We encourage faculty to publish in open access journals, but there are very few high quality, reputable ones in the medical field. So the Medical School decided to explore launching a series of open journals in an effort to provide for our faculty, staff and students more alternatives to the traditional subscription-based journals.”

Around the same time, BioMed Central approached Peter Arvan, Division Chief for Metabolism, Endocrinology, and Diabetes, and Director of the Michigan Comprehensive Diabetes Center, about starting a journal. Dr. Markovac, who consults Medical School faculty on alternative publishing models, and Dr. Arvan decided the Biomed Central partnership offered the best of both worlds, combining the model of a traditional peer-reviewed journal with a world-renowned open access publisher.

According to the BioMed Central license agreement, all articles published in the journal will be made available under a Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (or under a Creative Commons 1.0 Public Domain Dedication waiver, if required by law). This allows anyone to freely copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format, and also to remix, transform, and build upon the material.

Dr. Arvan, emphasizes, “The University of Michigan is proud to partner with BioMed Central for the launch of Clinical Diabetes and Endocrinology. We hope that this journal will have direct influence on the research and practice within the endocrine subspecialty. The diversity and remarkable credentials of this outstanding editorial board sends a signal that the journal stands for quality in publication to match the quality that we aspire to in our clinical practice.”

Ted Hanss, Chief Information Officer, University of Michigan Medical School, adds, “We are delighted to be partnering with BioMed Central to launch this exciting new open access publication which will allow for critical medical knowledge to be disseminated worldwide without boundaries or restrictions.”

Dr. Markovac concludes, “Everything aligned between our internal Medical School plans and what BioMed Central envisioned. If this goes well, we hope to launch more open access journals for other clinical departments at the Medical School.”

For more information about the journal, open access, or MSIS Health Sciences Publishing Services, please contact Jasna Markovac at jasnam@umich.edu.

Michigan Libraries for Life 2014 – An Invitation to All Libraries in Michigan!

 

ml4l_logo

If you could save a life, would you?  Most people would say “Yes!” without hesitation.  One of the simplest ways to save and improve lives is by supporting organ, tissue and eye donation.

For the past four years, libraries across Michigan have participated in a simple and effective campaign to educate patrons about donation and transplant, and to give them an opportunity to join the Michigan Organ Donor Registry. The campaign is called Michigan Libraries for Life. This effort, which began with the University of Michigan’s Taubman Health Sciences Library, and has expanded to include public, academic, special, and hospital libraries across the state. This collaborative effort has inspired more than 1,900 people to sign up as donors!

“We’ve received great feedback from library staff,” said Richard Pietroski, Gift of Life Michigan’s CEO. “They  appreciate having an easy yet meaningful way to engage their patrons in saving and improving lives. Michigan Libraries for Life gives hope to the 3,200 Michigan patients waiting for a life-saving organ transplant.”

More than 95% of Americans support organ, tissue and eye donation. Yet in Michigan only 44% of adults have joined the state’s donor registry, slightly less than the 47% national average.  That discrepancy is largely due to residents not knowing how to properly join the Registry.  Michigan Libraries for Life helps to address that informational need in our state.

“Someone you know probably needs – or will someday need – a lifesaving organ or tissue transplant.  People die waiting because not enough organs are available. Your library can be a great help by registering donors and/or providing awareness about organ donation,” said Anne Rau, librarian and living kidney donor. “By participating in Michigan Libraries for Life your library is helping to save lives.”

We are excited to bring this life-saving event back in 2014!  Libraries are welcome to participate for as many hours as they are able to staff a registration table in their libraries, from 2 hours to 7 days. This year’s drive will start on Monday, October 6th and run through Sunday, October 12th. Gift of Life Michigan will provide free in-person training for library representatives at their Ann Arbor office on Friday, August 22nd. We are also developing training materials for institutions that are unable to attend the in-person session.

“I enjoyed taking part in this well-orchestrated event,” commented one librarian. “I hope to participate again next year.”

The key to this program’s success is the participation of dozens of libraries. Your library is warmly invited to join the 2014 Michigan Libraries for Life organ donor registration drive. If your organization would like to participate in this year’s effort, please contact us at MichLib4Life@umich.edu or (734) 936-1394 to receive more information.

You can also find Michigan Libraries for Life on Facebook! www.facebook.com/ML4Life

For additional information visit: https://sites.google.com/site/michiganlibraries4life/home

 

Calling All Michigan Libraries!

MLibrary Healthy Communities

smalllogo-01(1)

For the last three years, libraries across Michigan have participated in a simple and effective campaign to educate patrons about organ, tissue, and eye donation and encouraged them to join the Michigan Organ Donor Registry. The campaign is called Michigan Libraries for Life. This effort was originally spearheaded in 2010 by the University of Michigan’s Taubman Health Sciences Library, but has expanded to include public, academic, special, and hospital libraries across the state. This collaborative effort has inspired 1348 people to sign up as donors!

More than 95% of Americans support organ, tissue and eye donation. In Michigan, only 39% of adults have joined the state’s donor registry, far lower than the 45% average nationwide.  That discrepancy is largely due to state residents not knowing how to properly join the Registry.  Michigan Libraries for Life helps to address that informational need.

We are excited to bring this…

View original post 166 more words

MLibrary Healthy Communities

AS_12-LIUB-Twitter-Icon

Today marks the 6th annual World Autism Awareness Day (WAAD). On December 18, 2007, the United Nations General Assembly adopted resolution 62/139, tabled by the State of Qatar, which declares April 2 as World Autism Awareness Day (WAAD) in perpetuity. WAAD is one of only three official health related United Nations Days and will bring the world’s attention to autism, a pervasive disorder that affects tens of millions.

The goal of this day is to raise awareness about autism throughout society and to encourage early diagnosis and early intervention. It further expresses deep concern at the prevalence and high rate of autism in children in all regions of the world and the consequent developmental challenges. Additionally, WAAD celebrates the unique talents and skills of persons with autism and looks towards a day when individuals with autism are warmly welcomed and embraced in community events around the globe.

To help spread…

View original post 18 more words

Add your thoughts here… (optional)

MLibrary Healthy Communities

Where can I find reliable health information available in Chinese?

What steps can I take to control diabetes?

How can I keep healthy?

Do you have these questions and want to find the answers in Chinese? From our work at outreach events, such as the Annual Asian American Health Fair, we know that many people do. The place to go is MedlinePlus, a website created by the National Library of Medicine. It contains reliable, up-to-date health information that’s easy to understand, for patients and health professionals alike. The Taubman Health Sciences Library has created a new video to show you how to find health information that is available in Chinese.

________________________________________________________________________________

在哪裏可以找到可靠的中文醫學信息?

可以採取哪些行動控制血糖?

如何才能養生保健?

您是否也有類似的問題,並且想找到中文解答呢?我們通過參與一年一度的亞裔健康節等外聯活動,得知許多人都有同樣的疑惑。 MedlinePlus可以為您提供幫助。它是美國國家醫學圖書館創建的網站,為患者和醫學專家們提供可靠的、最新的健康資訊,內容簡明易懂。

Taubman健康科學圖書館 制作了最新全中文MedlinePlus的教學視頻,教您如何在MedlinePlus上查尋中文醫學訊息。

View original post

Happy National Medical Librarians Month!

Your Best Return on Investment: Medical librarians are the best and most cost effective way to obtain quality health information.

The Medical Library Association has designated October as National Medical Librarians Month to raise awareness of the important role of the health information professional. Patients and those in the health care community need the specialized services that medical librarians provide now more than ever before.

MLibrary Healthy Communities

Logo designed by Abby Bedford 

Last year libraries across Michigan participated in a simple and effective campaign to educate patrons about organ, tissue, and eye donation and offer the opportunity to join the Michigan Organ Donor Registry, Michigan Libraries for Life. This effort was originally spearheaded in 2010 by the University of Michigan’s Taubman Health Sciences Library, but has expanded to include libraries on several university campuses across the state;  University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Dearborn, and Flint campuses, along with libraries at Eastern Michigan University, and Grand Valley State University. This collaborative effort resulted in registering 414 new organ donors, reaching over 1500 visitors with information on organ donation and registration information!

More than 95% of Americans support organ, tissue and eye donation. In Michigan, only 34% of adults have joined the Michigan Organ Donor Registry, far lower than the 43% average…

View original post 207 more words

IOM Report: Integrating Primary Care and Public Health

Public health is what we, as a society, do collectively to assure the conditions  in which people can be healthy. It takes a society to practice public health  Healthy People 2010, 2nd ed., With Understanding and Improving Health and Objectives for Improving Health. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2001.

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) recently published a report that examines the integration of primary care and public health, Primary Care and Public Health: Exploring Integration to Improve Population Health.

In the report, the IOM identifies a set of core principles derived from successful integration efforts that can be applied at the local level:

  1. having a common goal of improving population health
  2. involv­ing the community in defining and addressing its needs
  3. strong leadership that works to bridge disciplines, programs, and jurisdictions
  4. sustainability
  5. collaborative use of data and analysis.

Read the report