#AccessToResearch & More! — Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of February 3, 2014)

I was pretty excited to see the announcement of the UK Access to Research initiative, a partnership of publishers and libraries across the United Kingdom, which will hopefully extend open access research in ways that may serve as a model for other countries. They made some interesting choices, including requiring people to visit their local … Continue reading #AccessToResearch & More! — Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of February 3, 2014)

Why You Should Care About Creative Commons 4.0

Creative Commons, as many of you know, provides and promotes the sharing of material by creating licenses that allow authors to chose the conditions how their work can be reused. In the science community, Creative Commons is especially important because all scientific research is build on the reuse and re-analysis of other scientific works in … Continue reading Why You Should Care About Creative Commons 4.0

Open Access Publications Surge with NIH Mandate

In November 2012 the National Institutes of Health announced that in spring 2013 it would be enforcing its 2008 Public Access Policy (PAP) by not awarding non-competing grant continuations to those grantees who were not in compliance with the PAP - that is, with publications resulting from NIH grants submitted to the open access repository, … Continue reading Open Access Publications Surge with NIH Mandate

Rewarding Open Access – Nominations for the Accelerating Science Award Program

A new award, with major sponsorship from Google, the Public Library of Science (PLoS) and the Wellcome Trust, seeks to reward pioneers for the social good byawarding $30,000 to three people who have "applied scientific research published through open access" - in ANY field - for the benefit of society. The official award site is … Continue reading Rewarding Open Access – Nominations for the Accelerating Science Award Program

Public Comment Meetings on Access to Federally Supported Data & Publications

The National Academy of Sciences is holding 4 sessions over May 14-17 to gain public input on making available and accessing the results of federally funded efforts (both publications and data). Webinars will feature brief remarks by experts in each field, but the bulk of the time is reserved for public input. These sessions are … Continue reading Public Comment Meetings on Access to Federally Supported Data & Publications

Escaping the Paywall: Taxpayer-funded research will be free

Over the summer I wrote about a We the People petition asking the White House to mandate measures similar to the NIH Public Access Policy (in place since 2008)for more Federal agencies.  A quick review, the NIH PAP  has results from NIH-funded projects (eventually) published in open access journals and repositories. That petition has gotten … Continue reading Escaping the Paywall: Taxpayer-funded research will be free

Free Cytoscape Training Sessions in February

Cytoscape is an open source network visualization tool.  Cytoscape allows the exploration of molecular interactions and biological pathways and integrates these networks with annotations, gene expression profiles and other data. Interested in learning more about Cytoscape?  Attend one or both of the following hands-on workshops: Cytoscape:  Going from Raw Data to a Publishable Image During … Continue reading Free Cytoscape Training Sessions in February

Science, Scientists and Twitter

Michael Sean Gallagher: My Twitter Account as Data Visualization Most of you have probably already heard about Aaron Swartz's death last week, and the response from the science community focusing on supporting and promoting Aaron's vision for open access through the hashtag #PDFtribute occurring most prominently through Twitter. You can see an overview on the … Continue reading Science, Scientists and Twitter