Immunization & Vaccination Conversations — Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of May 5, 2014)

Last week we highlighted the CDC Grand Rounds on Autism. This week was World Immunization Awareness Week. Do you see a connection? I do. And you can guess what happened. Conversations from pro- and anti-vaccination exploded. Here are some of the hashtags that were used, but FYI, for me I found some of the most … Continue reading Immunization & Vaccination Conversations — Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of May 5, 2014)

Tough Topics on Twitter — Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of February 10, 2014)

Tough topics come up all the time on Twitter, and many of the Twitter chats explicitly present challenging concepts. Sometimes it works better than others. In general, people tend to think that Twitter won't lend itself to this, because of the forced brevity of tweets, but sometimes it works surprisingly well. Last week, there were … Continue reading Tough Topics on Twitter — Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of February 10, 2014)

#OutbreakWeek — Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of December 23, 2013)

Heading home for the holidays? Going to parties? Meeting up with old friends? All of these are potential ways in which infectious diseases are transmitted across the country, and across the globe. In preparation for this, there was a major public health outreach effort on Twitter last week called Outbreak Week, with the obvious hashtag. … Continue reading #OutbreakWeek — Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of December 23, 2013)

“Toward Quality Measures for Population Health and the Leading Health Indicators”

If you, like me, missed this report when it first appeared last summer, visit the Institute of Medicine website to read the free PDF (or to order a copy). Public health practice and health care delivery in the United States share a common goal: longer, healthier lives for all. Quality in health care is essential … Continue reading “Toward Quality Measures for Population Health and the Leading Health Indicators”

Sewell Stipend Award

  Taubman Health Sciences Library librarian, Judy Smith, has received the Sewell Stipend to attend the American Public Health Association (APHA) 141st Annual Meeting and Exposition in Boston, Massachusetts in November.  The Sewell Stipend is administered by the Public Health/Health Administration section of the Medical Library Association and provides financial support to librarians and information providers to attend the annual meetings of the APHA and … Continue reading Sewell Stipend Award

Institute of Medicine Webinar: Health & Global Climate Change

The second in a series of webinars from the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies (IOM),  this webinar will focus on Health in the Context of Global Climate Change. When: From 2:30pm – 4:00pm Eastern Time on Thursday, June 27. From the IOM's Roundatble on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine, the webinar series aims to … Continue reading Institute of Medicine Webinar: Health & Global Climate Change

Counting the sick and dead: Surveillance and society in contemporary Europe

From the Center for European Studies: Modern states use surveillance to watch the bodies of citizens, monitoring them for illness, infection, and threats to public health. Public health surveillance is, however, a poorly understood service and its importance, intrusiveness, and rate of technological change are rarely matched by administrative resources or academic understanding. We know … Continue reading Counting the sick and dead: Surveillance and society in contemporary Europe

New Resource: Funding for Public Health Graduate Students

In response to lots of interest from our colleagues at the School of Public Health, the Taubman Health Sciences Library has developed a new research guide: Funding Sources for the School of Public Health. Geared primarily toward graduate students seeking fellowships, internships, and research funding, this guide has information on: Opportunities specifically within the University … Continue reading New Resource: Funding for Public Health Graduate Students

Lecture – Economics and Human Biology – The Findings of 25 Years of Research

The first invited lecture in a series will be given by John Komlos, Professor of Economics, University of Munich and Visiting Professor of Economics, Duke University. Born in Hungary,  John Komlos is an American economic historian at the University of Munich where he is professor of economics and chair of economic history. He currently serves … Continue reading Lecture – Economics and Human Biology – The Findings of 25 Years of Research