Local Innovation & #MCubed – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of October 13, 2014)

MCubed Symposium
MCubed Symposium 2014: http://mcubed.umich.edu/mcubed_2014/index.html

Last week saw the second annual MCubed Symposium. For those who aren’t aware of MCubed already, here is a little background about this fabulously creative approach to funding and fostering innovation and collaboration at the University of Michigan.


MCubed – The University of Michigan’s revolutionary new way to fund research http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=akBGSlFn9nQ

Eventually there will be videos up for this year’s presentations (schedule), like there were last year, but for now you’ll have to settle for some tweets to introduce the high points.

Pubmed is LIVE on Social Media – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of July 21, 2014)

Pubmed Social Media Icons
PubMed Update: Social Media Icons Added. NLM Tech Bull. 2014 Jul-Aug;(399):b2. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/techbull/ja14/brief/ja14_pm_social_media_icons.html

Have you been straddling the fence deciding whether or not social media is “a thing” in healthcare? Well, maybe this will tip the balance. Pubmed now includes social media sharing icons at the article level, as shown in the image above. This is in addition to NIH’s own active life on social media. Unfortunately, when I was testing it out, every now and then what it shared was not the link to the article, but a link to the search strategy from which I found the articles. Hopefully, they’ll get that fixed, but usually it was good. Here’s what it looks like when sharing something to Twitter.

Pubmed Social Media Sharing Example: Twitter

In honor of this noteworthy change, I thought I’d divert from actual hashtags to seeing what people are sharing from Pubmed this week. If you really want hashtags, take a look at what hashtags they are ADDING to the posts, since Pubmed doesn’t automatically add any.

Freezing Patients Back to Life: Fact & Fiction

I recently finished The Curiosity , a fictional narrative about the discovery and “reanimation” of a century old frozen man.  Along the way, the researchers involved in this breakthrough have to grapple with the ethical choices of bringing this man back to life.  Yes, there is a romantic story line too but more often than not, this narrative focuses on the consequences of our decisions and how they affect us and others.

In Pittsburgh, PA, emergency room doctors are trying to save patient lives by replicating The Curiosity’s protagonist freezing process, to a lesser degree.  Only patients who come to the ER with “ ‘catastrophic penetrating trauma’ and who have lost so much blood that they have gone into cardiac arrest” will be eligible for participation in this Department of Defense clinical trial.  Doctors will replace the patient’s blood with freezing saltwater, inducing hypothermia, in the hopes of providing more time to triage wounds and prevent death.

Each time they do, they will be stepping into a scientific void. Ethicists say it’s reasonable to presume most people would want to undergo the experimental procedure when the alternative is almost certain death. But no one can be sure of the outcome.

I wonder about the review these doctors would give The Curiosity.

AMA Code of Medical Ethics (1850) Book Cover (Public Domain) Retrieved from National Library of Medicine Digital Collections

AMA Code of Medical Ethics (1850) Book Cover (Public Domain) Retrieved from National Library of Medicine Digital Collections

BioRxiv: A Preprint Archive for the Life Sciences

BioRxiv

I just found out that some of my friends had not yet heard about BioRxiv, the preprint archive for the biological and life science which was launched by Cold Spring Harbor Press last November.

What is the idea behind it? They released a great video yesterday to explain it.


bioRxiv The Preprint Server for Biology https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EwAMtT3ZIpg

The buzz has reached such influential journals as SCIENCE and NATURE, so you know they are legitimate. This is how they describe themselves.

“bioRxiv (pronounced “bio-archive”) is a free online archive and distribution service for unpublished preprints in the life sciences. It is operated by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, a not-for-profit research and educational institution. By posting preprints on bioRxiv, authors are able to make their findings immediately available to the scientific community and receive feedback on draft manuscripts before they are submitted to journals.”

Jon Wilkins gives excellent reasons for participating in his blogpost on Lost in Transcription: open access, speed, normalization, feedback, and “the left side of history.”

Five Reasons Biologists Should Use Preprint Servers http://jonfwilkins.com/2013/11/five-reasons-biologists-should-use-preprint-servers/

I’d also argue that getting your work out in public view under your own name helps to define your claim to the work, and gives you preemptive identification with the concepts. Not to mention that visibility can lead to or support publication (and there is the absolutely delicious feeling that comes when an editor sees the preprint and asks you to submit your article to their journal).

Just to make it even better, bioRxiv readership and use are included in altmetrics.

This might just make an interesting expansion upon placing your work in Deep Blue, and could also help fulfill some grant requirements for placing work in spaces accessible to the public. Issues to ponder.

#AccessToResearch & More! — Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of February 3, 2014)

#AccessToResearch

I was pretty excited to see the announcement of the UK Access to Research initiative, a partnership of publishers and libraries across the United Kingdom, which will hopefully extend open access research in ways that may serve as a model for other countries. They made some interesting choices, including requiring people to visit their local library in order to get access.

#AccessToResearch

Library on the Road cancelled today

Because the university has cancelled classes, Library on the Road, where library informationists come to the School of Public Health, will be cancelled today.  Look for us again next Tuesday in 1629 Crossroads.

If you need help using library resources for projects or classes, don’t know what a citation management program is, but need to find out, send us an email at  SPHLibraryHelp@umich.edu with your questions or to set up an individual consultation.

 

Scopus interface changing February 1

Changes are coming to the interface of Scopus that will streamline your workflow by optimizing the interface for core uses.

One important change is that the interface becomes more action driven:  when you select certain results to work with (e.g. for refinement, citation analysis or to export references), the action buttons or links will become “active” & make the experience more intuitive. The results page will be optimized to make it easier to scan your search results.

The Author profile will get a ‘CV-style’ design that will let you more easily scan the main column that includes information such as h-index, documents, &  citations. It will show the 20 most recent documents.  You’ll also be able to see more documents on the free Author profile version that researchers can view without having access to Scopus.

Another important change is that you will now be able to export references directly from Scopus to Mendeley.

For more information on the upcoming changes, click here.

Upcycling: Bringing new life to existing health data

From the Health Affairs Blog:

By now, most of us are familiar with recycling. Items with reclaimable value are collected; then base materials are salvaged to create new products—often of lesser quality.

Fewer people are familiar with the term upcycling, a form of recycling that involves reconceiving, and sometimes adding to, existing items with the goal of giving them a different purpose and higher value. Though the term may be unfamiliar, the concept is old. A hundred years ago, farm families upcycled feed sacks into dresses, and old doors into furniture. The fleece jackets we now see everywhere, often made from reclaimed plastic bottles, are a modern example of upcycling.

In the world of health care data, too, opportunities exist to upcycle by adding to and repurposing existing information. It makes good sense to leverage investments in data collection, many of which have already been made for other reasons, such as public health surveillance and provider billing: doing so reduces data collection and cost burdens. The California HealthCare Foundation, based in Oakland, is actively pursuing data-upcycling initiatives as part of its mission to make useful information about health care quality publicly available. Two such efforts are highlighted below.

Maternity Care Data
More than 500,000 California women give birth each year; yet little information exists to guide decisions about where to seek high-quality maternity care. Providers themselves often lack information about their own performance. To help fill this gap, the California Maternal Data Center was launched in 2012 (it is cofunded by the California HealthCare Foundation and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and operated by the California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative). By repurposing data that hospitals and the state government have long collected, it provides metrics on the quality of maternity care. The California Maternal Data Center links birth certificate data (for example, birth weight, delivering provider) with information included in patient discharge data (for example, diagnostic and procedure codes related to the birth) that hospitals are already required to submit to the state.

With this combination of data, the center is able to produce robust measures, such as rates of cesarean sections, episiotomies, and vaginal birth after C-section, on all California hospitals providing maternity care. With a small amount of additional work, hospitals can voluntarily submit additional data elements from targeted medical chart reviews (that is, reviews of a subset of charts identified by the California Maternal Data Center to be most relevant) to generate other measures, such as elective delivery before thirty-nine weeks. Many participating hospitals are using the center’s data to facilitate quality improvement, and plans are under way to support public reporting at the hospital and physician-practice levels.

To read the complete post, click here.

First-ever quantitative data about the toll of BPA exposure

From Health Affairs:

The risks of exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA) have been well-known for some time. While exposure to BPA in the United States affects an estimated 92.6 percent of Americans over the age of five, there are gaps in the knowledge of the health consequences of BPA exposure. A new study, Further Limiting Bisphenol A In Food Uses Could Provide Health And Economic Benefits, presents the first estimate of the potential disease burden and costs associated with ongoing exposure to BPA. It found that $2.98 billion in annual costs are attributable to BPA-associated childhood obesity and adult coronary heart disease. Of the $2.98 billion, the study identified $1.49 billion in childhood obesity costs, the first environmentally attributable costs of child obesity to be documented.

The study modeled the potential health and economic benefits associated with replacing BPA in all food uses by quantifying childhood obesity and adult coronary heart disease attributable to BPA exposure in the United States in the year 2008. The data used were from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for 2003-2008 as well as other sources. Its analysis methodology followed the approach developed by the Institute of Medicine in assessing the “fractional contribution” of the environment to the causation of illness in the United States. “This analysis suggests that regulatory action to reduce BPA exposure could produce net benefits to society,” concludes the author. “From an economic perspective, it might make sense for the Food and Drug Administration to require that an additive free of obesogenic and cardiovascular risks be substituted for BPA. However, pre-market testing of potential substitutes is needed to prevent the use of another synthetic chemical instead of BPA that may lead to the same or worse health consequences.”

Read the article here.

Palliative care, health policy, and health reform

From the Health Affairs Blog:

In the United States, value is the new health care imperative – improving quality while controlling costs.  We spend nearly twice the rate of comparable nations, yet have poorer health outcomes.  In 2010, President Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), mandating a new emphasis on paying for value, not volume.

Our greatest opportunity to enhance value in US health care is to improve quality of care for older adults with serious illness – the group who uses the most health care services. Serious illness, in which patients are unlikely to recover, stabilize, or be cured, is life-altering for patients and family caregivers.  It includes advanced, symptomatic stages of diseases such as congestive heart failure, chronic lung disease, cancer, kidney failure, and dementia. Serious illness may also refer to the cumulative consequences of multiple conditions progressing over time, causing functional decline or frailty. 

We’ve made important progress in understanding high quality care for this population of patients.  Researchers have asked patients with serious illness and their families how they define high quality care.  Especially in serious illness, patients want control over treatment through shared decision-making.   Even when there is no cure, most patients still want health care that helps them live longer – but only if they can also get help with function, physical comfort, and attention to family, emotional and spiritual needs.

 Read the complete post here.