Announcement: We’ve moved!

The Taubman Health Sciences Library News Blog has a new home on the University of Michigan Library’s website. The focus of the new blog is to share THL specific news and announcements. Most of the content from this website will not be migrated, but all previous posts will remain available here.

Please update all links and bookmarks to the new URL and we hope that you enjoy the updates.

http://www.lib.umich.edu/blogs/thl-news-blog

Global Innovation – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of October 20, 2014)

Cool Toys pics of the day: Engelbart Mural

Last week has been rich with ideas for innovation on Twitter, this time with a national and international flavor. Just walking through a sampler of examples from several different conversations (AMA’s Equity Chat, the bioethics Twitter collaboration with the ASBH annual conference, international open access week, and capping the list with the BBC’s World Changing Ideas Summit).


EquityChat

I was riding the train home from Iowa, having visited my very ill father and feeling a tad distraught and fragmented, then stumbled into the AMA’s Equity Chat without a clue it was even happening. It just showed up in my stream, and I joined in. What a great chat about how to shift medical education toward a more diverse and inclusive community, and how doing so will benefit society at large, small communities, marginalized groups, and ultimately everyone.


BIOETHX + ASBH14 = ASBH14 BIOETHX

Not that I haven’t seen this before, but shouldn’t EVERY major conference partner with a topically affiliated Twitter chat community during the conference to help engage a broader community in discussing the issues and pushing out important information and findings presented at the conference? We talk about translational medicine, but isn’t this a fundamental strategy for communicating core fundings to the audiences most likely to disseminate and implement them? Anyway, so the bioethics weekly chat teamed up with the American Society of Bioethics and Humanities for their annual meeting this week. I guarantee that a LOT more people noticed the conference than would have otherwise!


Open Access Week

While open access is not, right now, this year, a brand new shiny idea, it is still very much novelty historically and absolutely pivotal in promoting and supporting innovation. That was a big part of why the University of Michigan invited Jack Andraka to be the keynote speaker for our own Open Access Week events with the theme of Generation Open. These tweets are not just from Jack’s presentation, though, but also from other innovations taking place as part of OAW.


Ada Lovelace Day 2014 (ALD14)

The Equity Chat and Open Access Week both emphasize equality, diversity, and accessibility as essential components of innovation and positive change. Thus, it makes sense to also include tweets from the Ada Lovelace Day events, focused on awareness of women’s contributions to science and creating a vision of science practice that is inclusive of women and engaging to young women. And, speaking of innovation approaches, anyone else notice the incredible creativity and artistry of the efforts in this area? Wow!


World Changing Ideas Summit

I was so excited to discover the BBC’s new (hopefully annual) initiative to promote innovation and awareness of innovation: World Changing Ideas Summit. Aside from the tweets below, check out their collection of great posts and videos.

Open Access Journal on Clinical Diabetes and Endocrinology

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Through a unique publishing collaboration, the University of Michigan and BioMed Central have launched a new open access journal, Clinical Diabetes and Endocrinology, which is now seeking submissions and set to begin publishing in the first quarter of 2015. The journal is led by Editor-in-Chief Meng H. Tan, Professor of Internal Medicine in the Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology, and Diabetes at the University of Michigan.

Dr. Tan states, “Clinical Diabetes and Endocrinology aims to promote better care for people with diabetes and endocrine diseases by sharing with their health professionals new research and clinical knowledge on various aspects of their diseases. This collaborative academic-private initiative will make the new knowledge readily, freely, and immediately accessible to these health professionals worldwide so it can have a global impact.”

Jasna Markovac, Senior Director, Learning Design and Publishingor Medical School Information Services (MSIS), explains, “The University of Michigan has a history of emphasizing the importance of open scholarship, open access, and open publishing. We encourage faculty to publish in open access journals, but there are very few high quality, reputable ones in the medical field. So the Medical School decided to explore launching a series of open journals in an effort to provide for our faculty, staff and students more alternatives to the traditional subscription-based journals.”

Around the same time, BioMed Central approached Peter Arvan, Division Chief for Metabolism, Endocrinology, and Diabetes, and Director of the Michigan Comprehensive Diabetes Center, about starting a journal. Dr. Markovac, who consults Medical School faculty on alternative publishing models, and Dr. Arvan decided the Biomed Central partnership offered the best of both worlds, combining the model of a traditional peer-reviewed journal with a world-renowned open access publisher.

According to the BioMed Central license agreement, all articles published in the journal will be made available under a Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (or under a Creative Commons 1.0 Public Domain Dedication waiver, if required by law). This allows anyone to freely copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format, and also to remix, transform, and build upon the material.

Dr. Arvan, emphasizes, “The University of Michigan is proud to partner with BioMed Central for the launch of Clinical Diabetes and Endocrinology. We hope that this journal will have direct influence on the research and practice within the endocrine subspecialty. The diversity and remarkable credentials of this outstanding editorial board sends a signal that the journal stands for quality in publication to match the quality that we aspire to in our clinical practice.”

Ted Hanss, Chief Information Officer, University of Michigan Medical School, adds, “We are delighted to be partnering with BioMed Central to launch this exciting new open access publication which will allow for critical medical knowledge to be disseminated worldwide without boundaries or restrictions.”

Dr. Markovac concludes, “Everything aligned between our internal Medical School plans and what BioMed Central envisioned. If this goes well, we hope to launch more open access journals for other clinical departments at the Medical School.”

For more information about the journal, open access, or MSIS Health Sciences Publishing Services, please contact Jasna Markovac at jasnam@umich.edu.

Radiation Oncology Journal Club (#RadOnc) – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of September 29, 2014)

Screenshot of article's abstract.

JAMA: Use of and mortality after bilateral mastectomy … http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1900512

I’ve previously mentioned medical journal clubs on Twitter. Today I wanted to show some of what happens in the real conversation. The Radiation Oncology Journal Club (#RadOnc) has a very accessible model for managing the journal club and making it easy to engage in the conversation. After all, they know how busy doctors really are, and what scheduling is like. The journal club runs over the entire weekend. The conversation isn’t exactly synchronous (same time) or asynchronous (whenever), but rather semi-synchronous, a loosely defined time period where you can gather with friends and colleagues, but people tend to wander in and out of the conversation. However, it’s an international party, so you will hear comparisons about treatment standards in different parts of the world. They’ve explicitly stated that the journal club is bilingual, English/Spanish/Español, so there’s that to make it interesting (challenging) as well. Sometimes they are lucky, and can get the authors of the paper to step in and answer questions. One of the other quirky things about doing this on Twitter is that, even though the conversation is mostly other radiation oncologists and doctors, there are interested patients who come in and ask questions or share thoughts, concerns, and insights. It can be a great educational tool on both sides!

From the National Library of Medicine: Roosevelt at NIH

I am taking a course this semester on archives and social memory and when I saw this announcement from the National Library of Medicine, I thought the blog would be a great venue to share the power of archives.

The National Library of Medicine has released this video almost 74 years after FDR spoke at the National Institutes of Health to dedicate the National Cancer Institute.

If you are interested in see more archival data from the 1940s and/or the National Library of Medicine, check their Digital Collection or YouTube channel.    And if you want to learn more about the Roosevelt family, catch the reruns of Ken Burn’s latest film, The Roosevelts: An Intimate History, on PBS.  (My parents saw it and highly recommend it.  It is on my to-watch list for winter break!)

Patients on the Right TEDMED Questions – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of September 22, 2014)

Role of the patient: How do we empower patients to make healthier decisions? What is the patient's role from his or her perspective? What is the role of healthy people (non-patients) in healthcare?

TEDMED Great Challenges: Role of the Patient (photo by Dr. Nick Dawson)

Last week, we talked about the trend toward patient engagement in events that may have previously been focused almost exclusively on medical professionals. A spin off from that rich conversation was when the patient advocates began to question what are the right questions to be asking about patient engagement. Even more impressive, TEDMED was sometimes asking if they have the right questions, so this is a conversation valued from several perspectives.

What I’m observing, however, is a sense of not being included on the part of patients, and a strong need for greater engagement by patients in the process by which TEDMED develops their questions and Great Challenges. Just in case there are those who aren’t aware of this, TEDMED has an online community space where these matters are discussed. Anyone can create an account and ID for participating in this conversation. Know someone you think should be participating? Ask they if they’ve joined, or better yet, invite them.

TEDMED: Great Challenges: http://www.tedmed.com/greatchallenges

TEDMED: Account Creation: https://www.tedmed.com/accounts/login?redirectto=%2Fgreatchallenges&ref=account-login

Here are some of the tweets from that tangential conversation, beginning with the one that started it all.

TEDMED on Patient Engagement – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of September 15, 2014)

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TEDMED 2014: Image from presentation, believed to be by Marc Koska.

At Stanford’s Medicine X event, the patient is front and center to the whole experience, an essential partner in helping to innovate in healthcare, as well as in helping to plan the event. In the week following #MedX the Healthcare Leader (#hcldr) Twitter chat also discussed the why and how of engaging patients in healthcare professional conferences with the goal of encouraging fast, relevant innovation in healthcare. Imagine my delight when the same theme cropped up AGAIN at TEDMED. The image opening this blogpost was captured from one of the presentations at TEDMED, I think one by Marc Koska, in which the discussion was about identifying the most important stakeholders for improving (revolutionizing) healthcare, and what relationships are needed among those stakeholder communities. As he kept talking, more and more lines were drawn, connecting the various groups. Ultimately, they are all connected to each other. Thinking of patients, this means patients should be actively engaged in conversations with health care providers, insurance, policy makers, device designers and manufacturers, drug companies, researchers, and so forth.

Part of the point of engaging with actual patients is that you don’t always know what they’ll say. You want to help, and you think you know what will help them, but you can’t truly KNOW until you talk with a lot of patients, to learn about different types of experiences, needs, and perspectives. Sometimes what they say can be quite surprising. Kitra Cahana was a presenter at TEDMED who described her father, Ronnie, spelling out messages with eyeblinks after a major stroke resulting in “locked in syndrome.” What was he saying? Some of the most intelligent, coherent, poetic messages describing the patient experience that I have ever encountered.

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So TEDMED asked. They’ve define patient engagement as one of the Great Challenges facing healthcare. “What is the role of the patient? How do we empower patients to make healthier decisions? What is the patient’s role from his or her perspective? What is the role of health people (non-patients) in healthcare?” Here is part of what they asked, and part of what they heard.

@JoelHigh “We have to go deeper with patient to understand their values”

@roseperson “Empower patients to make healthy decisions by advocating for policies and incentives to make healthy=easy”

@LALupusLady “Manage my chronic condition with a TEAM of HCPs, also strive to control flares”

JAMA Article: The Importance of Engaging Medical Librarians in Reviews

The informationists at the Taubman Health Sciences Library are ready and willing to collaborate with clinical faculty and staff across the health sciences schools and the health system on research and literature searches.

This article (Engaging Medical Librarians to Improve the Quality of Review Articles) from the Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA), out today, speaks directly to the value of collaborating with medical librarians and informationists.  A two page read that could provide an exponential return on investment.

Medical librarians play a central role in assisting clinicians access medical literature needed to provide patient care.4 They also can play an important role in developing high-quality narrative and systematic reviews, constructing search strategies, managing references, reviewing references for inclusion, documenting the search methodology, and contributing to the drafting of the final manuscript. Having a medical librarian closely involved ensures that the review will be thorough and its methodology reproducible. Medical librarians bring expertise to the review process based on their understanding of the medical literature, search methods, and re- view guidelines and standards. Their neutrality and expertise can help minimize bias in the review process, leading to more robust and un- biased review articles. – Excerpt from Rethlefsen, Murad, & Livingston (2014)

Rethlefsen ML, Murad M, Livingston EH. Engaging Medical Librarians to Improve the Quality of Review Articles. JAMA.2014;312(10):999-1000. doi:10.1001/jama.2014.9263.

Collaboration (2013) designed by Krisada from the thenounproject.com (CC BY 3.0)

Collaboration designed by Krisada from the thenounproject.com

 

MedX, and TEDMED, and the Inauguration, Oh, MY!!

MedX, UM Inaugural Symposia, TEDMED

Last week I was privileged to listen in on a press conference for the upcoming TEDMED. Tomorrow is the Symposia for the Inauguration of UM’s new President, Mark S. Schlissel, with Harold Varmus as a guest speaker! Later tomorrow and this weekend, I’ll be watching Stanford’s Medicine X (#MedX) through their Global Access program. Next week the UM Medical School will be hosting a viewing of TEDMED. I feel like I’m swimming in an intellectual biomedical broth!


President Schlissel Inauguration Symposia with Harold Varmus

Inaugural Symposia: Sustaining the Biomedical Research Enterprise and Privacy and Identity in a Hyperconnected Society

HASHTAG: #UMPres14
LIVESTREAM (1): http://umich.edu/watch/
LIVESTREAM (2): http://www.mgoblue.com/collegesportslive/?media=461850

The Inaugural Symposia for President Schissel’s investiture (8:30am ET to 12:00 noon ET) are composed of two very interesting topics and even more interesting collections of speakers. The first part, “Sustaining the Biomedical Research Enterprise,” is the section including the famous Harold Varmus, but also five other notable researchers from on campus, experts in chemistry, genetics/genomics, neuroscience, statistics, and biomedical imaging. (I’m excited that three of the five have expertise related to genomics!)

The focus of the first symposia centers around a recent article from Varmus and colleagues entitled, “Rescuing US biomedical research from its systemic flaws.

The provocative abstract states:

“The long-held but erroneous assumption of never-ending rapid growth in biomedical science has created an unsustainable hypercompetitive system that is discouraging even the most outstanding prospective students from entering our profession—and making it difficult for seasoned investigators to produce their best work. This is a recipe for long-term decline, and the problems cannot be solved with simplistic approaches. Instead, it is time to confront the dangers at hand and rethink some fundamental features of the US biomedical research ecosystem.”

Those three ‘simple’ sentences imply an enormity of challenges which impact both locally and globally. I guarantee it will be fascinating to hear this panel discuss these and brainstorm ways in which the University of Michigan might work towards addressing them here.


Stanford Medicine X

Stanford Medicine X 2014

HASHTAG: #MedX
LIVESTREAM: Available with pre-registration through the MedX Global Access program: http://medicinex.stanford.edu/2014-global-access-program/.

Lucky for me, the Stanford Medicine X event is on the other coast, so our local event will be almost completed when they begin livestreaming at 8AM PT (11AM ET). However, Medicine X conference lasts a solid three days, and includes topics from self-tracking to self-awareness, from entrepreneurship to partnership in design, from compassion to PCORI, from pain to clinical trials to games. It’s intense. A lot of my friends will be there, too many to name, but they include doctors, patients, geeks, and more. MedX is a powerful diverse community, and this is an exciting event.

Schedule: http://medicinex.stanford.edu/2014-schedule/


TEDMED 2014

TEDMED 2014

HASHTAGS: #TEDMED; #TEDMEDlive; #TEDMEDhive; #GreatChallenges.
LIVESTREAMING OPTIONS: http://www.tedmed.com/event/tedmedlive

TEDMED is a little different from the other two events in that it isn’t sponsored through higher education and the livestream isn’t usually free. For folk here in Ann Arbor, there is a way to watch it on campus. What you’ll see if you come includes very little that is expected. Even when someone has a job description that might sound like regular healthcare folk, what they are talking about will probably be a surprise. Beyond the idea of doctor, patient, nurse or neuroscientist, you will also hear comedians, musicians, athletes, bioethicists, military, philosophers, inventors, and more. But what else would you expect, when the theme of the event is “Unlocking Imagination”?

The TEDMED event is a little more complicated than in prior years because they are having presenters and events on both coasts — in Washington DC and in San Francisco. Some parts will overlap. Other parts won’t. You can check out the schedules for both coasts here.

Washington DC Stage Schedule (pdf)

San Francisco CA Stage Schedule (pdf)

To watch locally, details are given below.

Watch the Live Stream of TEDMED Conference, September 10-12

The Medical School will host a live stream from the TEDMED conference, which takes place September 10-12 in Washington DC and San Francisco. The focus of this year’s program is “Unlocking Imagination in Service of Health and Medicine.” Presenters include some of the most respected and undiscovered names in science, journalism, education, business, and technology. Click here to see the conference schedule. Viewing times and locations for watching the live streams are:

Wednesday, September 10: 8am-5pm: University Hospital South (Old Mott) 8th floor lounge
Thursday, September 11: 8am-12pm, 1pm-5pm: University Hospital South (Old Mott) 8th floor lounge
Friday, September 12: 8am-11:30am: University Hospital South (Old Mott) 8409 Conference Room
Friday, September 12: 11:30am-5pm: University Hospital South (Old Mott) 8419 IDTT Collaboration Space