Export from Scopus using Mendeley

Until recently, it wasn’t possible to export directly to Mendeley from Scopus, but the Web Importer has now been improved to work with Scopus, as well as with ScienceDirect.

Mend_ScopusImport

As always, the importer retrieves all the relevant metadata for the documents you’re importing, in a smooth & intuitive process.

If you have questions about Mendeley, contact us @ SPHLibraryHelp@umich.edu or use our Mendeley research guide.

 

Library on the Road, Citation Management Edition!

mendeley       

Today, the Taubman Health Sciences Library wil be coming to the School of Public Health to give brief demonstrations & answering questions about free citation management programs: Mendeley, RefWorks, & Zotero.

Come to 1623 SPH 1 from 10:00-11:30, with your questions & computer (if you’d like).

As always, if you can’t come or would like to spend more time on this topic, please contact us (SPHLibraryhelp@umich.edu) to arrange for an individual or small group consultations, either at the library or at SPH.

Library on the Road, Citation Management Edition!

mendeley       

Today, the Taubman Health Sciences Library wil be coming to the School of Public Health to give brief demonstrations & answering questions about free citation management programs: Mendeley, RefWorks, & Zotero.

Come to 1623 SPH 1 from 10:00-11:30, with your questions & computer (if you’d like).

As always, if you can’t come or would like to spend more time on this topic, please contact us (SPHLibraryhelp@umich.edu) to arrange for an individual or small group consultations, either at the library or at SPH.

Library on the Road, Citation Management Edition!

mendeley       

Today, the Taubman Health Sciences Library wil be coming to the School of Public Health to give brief demonstrations & answering questions about free citation management programs: Mendeley, RefWorks, & Zotero.

Come to 1623 SPH 1 from 10:00-11:30, with your questions & computer (if you’d like).

As always, if you can’t come or would like to spend more time on this topic, please contact us (SPHLibraryhelp@umich.edu) to arrange for an individual or small group consultations, either at the library or at SPH.

New for next week – Library on the Road, Citation Management Edition!

mendeley       

Beginning next week, the Taubman Health Sciences Library wil be coming to the School of Public Health 2 days each week.  On Wednesdays, we’ll be giving brief demonstrations & answering questions about citation management programs, such as Mendeley, RefWorks, & Zotero.

Come to 1623 SPH 1 October 9, 16, & 23 from 10:00-11:30, with your questions & computer (if you’d like).

As always, if you can’t come or would like to spend more time on this topic, please contact us (SPHLibraryhelp@umich.edu) to arrange for an individual or small group consultations, either at the library or at SPH.

New iOS app for Mendeley

mendeleyMendeley has just released a new app for the iPhone & iPad.  It’s been rebuilt from the ground up & it’s still free!  Here are some of the new features:

Highlight important text and record your thoughts with sticky notes

  •  Sync highlights and notes to Mendeley Desktop on Windows, Mac, or Linux
  •  Sync wirelessly without interrupting your workflow
  •  Easily tap-to-download full-text files
  •  Fullscreen reading in any orientation
  •  Explore papers related to the one you’re reading
  •  Supports nested folders in your library and groups
  •  Easily tag documents or add them to folders

For more information, visit the Mendeley blog.

Edit Output Styles in Mendeley

This post was originally posted on the Public Health – Research & Library News blog here

mendeley

 

 

Mendeley now lets you edit (aka customize) an exisiting bibliographic output style, so that if the style you need isn’t available in Mendeley, you can easily create the style you need.  Since this can be a nitpicky process, the Taubman Health Sciences Library has published a step-by-step handout that takes you through the process step-by-step.  You can also find it in our Mendeley Basics research guide.

And if you have questions, just ask for help @  thlibrary@umich.edu.

 

Mendeley + Elsevier – A Marriage Made in Bibliographic Heaven?

Screen Shot 2013-04-23 at 10.36.43 AM

Chances are that by now you’ve heard about Mendeley‘s sale to Elsevier. There had been rumors circulating for some time about the sale, but I heard when they made it official in April – naturally, from a well-informed classmate who heard via Twitter (kudos to @emilyrnlds for the tip).

I thought about posting this in the immediate days after the announcement, but frankly I wanted to see how things would shake out – and naturally, the internet didn’t disappoint.

Twitter users rushed for a pun-filled spin on the issue with #mendelsevier and #mendelete (again, @emilyrnlds led me to those hashtags). But I was curious about some reactions more in-depth than 140 characters, so here’s a round up of what I found:

TL;DR: What does it mean for me?

  • If you’ve got an individual Mendeley account, it’ll still be free
  • You’ll get more (free) storage – 2GB for individual accounts, 5GB for premium and institutional accounts
  • Mendeley will develop an Android app soon to complement it’s iOS usage
  • The API will remain open
  • Do you care about open access/data? That’s not going to fit into a bullet point – so read on:

I anticipated some of the ire from the Mendeley user community due to the dichotomy between Mendeley’s open “hey come look at what your peer group is reading! Collaborate! Innovate!” culture and Elsevier’s rather…controversial business practices; the New Yorker writes Elsevier is:

infamous for restricting the flow of scientific information so it can sell research papers for as much as fifty dollars a piece, generating profit margins of thirty-six per cent and netting the company billions of dollars in revenue annually. The company has fought legislation designed to open up academic research, offered scholars money to file positive reviews, sued libraries for oversharing, and allegedly published fake journals on behalf of the pharmaceuticals industry.

And indeed this seems to fuel the bulk of the user complaints. As part of his response (linked above), David Weinberger writes:

The idea of my reading behaviors adding economic value to a company making huge profits by locking scholarship behind increasingly expensive paywalls is, in a word, repugnant.

And here is where the Scholarly Kitchen blog shines as a beacon of well-balanced online authorship by pointing out the concerns and how, despite the press releases and blog posts and social media chats from Mendelsevier, they avoid

“the question about whether users have the right to openly share copyrighted or licensed content via Mendeley even if they or their institution subscribe (or if there is a CC-BY-NC license associated with the work)…one that ties into the legal risks around this deal and the longevity of Mendeley’s central premise of PDF sharing now that it’s owned by Elsevier.”

Yet, as Kent Anderson (contributing author to Scholarly Kitchen and CEO/publisher of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery) points out,

“in the long run, it’s likely better for publishers to see [article usage statistics] under the roof of a company with incentive for respecting copyright, rather than an independent wildcard with no such ties…[since] it’s worth noting that publishers tend to take services at face value, as Connotea and CiteULike were used by many platforms across journals, despite being owned by Nature Publishing Group and supported by Springer, respectively.”

Recognizing that this may not be the most popular opinion, I would like to be cautiously optimistic. I think there could possibly be benefits by having a dedicated system backed by a well-funded company to measure the article-level metrics – which is really where I think the next impact factor is going to come from (Jason Priem, a PhD student at UNC-Chapel Hill will convince you of this in one presentation or less). I had the pleasure of hearing Jason speak at the Medical Library Association conference earlier this month, and naturally in the question portion someone asked about Mendelsevier. For now, I’m sticking with his response (which I won’t quote as I’m paraphrasing and can’t recall the exact wording, but it was something along the lines of): Both companies have said they will preserve Mendeley’s commitment to openness, and that’s what I’ll stick to until I see otherwise.

What’s Mendeley? And Why You’re Going to Love It.

mendeley

I won’t spend a ton of time here going into the (many) reasons why Mendeley is so phenomenal, because I”m pretty sure that just 1 fact will be enough to convince you: drag & drop.

Let’s say you have a PDF of that perfect article (or 10) for the paper you’re writing:

Mendeley1

With Mendeley, all you have to do is drag & drop the PDF into Mendeley Desktop (downloadable on Windows, Mac, & Linux), and (this is the BEST part) Mendeley automatically extracts all the metadata from the PDF and you have a full citation, with practically no effort on your part:

mendeley2

We literally had people gasp during this demonstration. I promise you’ll love it.

Now, there are a ton of additional features in Mendeley – it has become the social network for researchers because it is so easy to share information and see what your peers in the field are reading & researching. The University of Michigan is one of the largest university users to boot.

We have some really wonderful guides to help you get started with Mendeley (and the company itself has pretty great support products/videos); there’s also this handy comparison chart of the various citation management options available at UM, because depending on your needs, Mendeley might not necessarily be the best fit for you. You can always set up some time with your Liaison Librarian to discuss the best option for you!

And 2 final points of warning (because what sort of librarian-in-training would I be if I didn’t test the system before recommending it to you?):

1. If you’re used to using EndNote  and attaching PDFs to citations, then beware that if you delete the PDF, you won’t be able to click the PDF icon in Mendeley Desktop and still being able open up the article (because unlike EndNote, at least EndNote X6, Mendeley does not duplicate the PDF in a .data folder). In the screenshots above, after I dragged the article into Mendeley, then deleted the article from my desktop, I could no longer reopen the article from within Mendeley Desktop. However, if you just move the PDF around to a different location on your computer, Mendeley will still be able to locate the article.

2. This drag & drop feature is only as good as the metadata attached to the PDF – the example above is a 2012 article with lots of metadata (thankfully) attached to it; this isn’t always the case, especially with older articles.

Featured Workshop – Three for Free! Citation Management Software Options

Want to know more about the free citation management programs that you can use to organize your references (& so much more)? Come to this workshop from the Taubman Health Sciences Library to learn about your options: Mendeley, RefWorks, and Zotero.

Date: Monday, Nov. 5
Time: 10:00-11:30
Location: 2615 Crossroads SPH I
Cost: Free

Register for the workshop here.

For more information, contact us at SPHLibraryHelp@umich.edu