Local Innovation & #MCubed – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of October 13, 2014)

MCubed Symposium
MCubed Symposium 2014: http://mcubed.umich.edu/mcubed_2014/index.html

Last week saw the second annual MCubed Symposium. For those who aren’t aware of MCubed already, here is a little background about this fabulously creative approach to funding and fostering innovation and collaboration at the University of Michigan.


MCubed – The University of Michigan’s revolutionary new way to fund research http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=akBGSlFn9nQ

Eventually there will be videos up for this year’s presentations (schedule), like there were last year, but for now you’ll have to settle for some tweets to introduce the high points.

Suicide Prevention & Trauma on Social Media – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of October 6, 2014)

TRIGGER WARNING - Suicide Posts on WHISPER

Sunday night I participated in a very interesting chat on Twitter. It was part of the #SPSM chat, which stands for Suicide Prevention and Social Media. The chat was about an experience I had last summer. To make it overly brief, I ended up in an extended conversation with a suicidal person through an anonymous social media service, and I didn’t know what to do, how to do, or even whether to do anything. At that time, I was curious, and explored social media posts that state suicidal ideation or intent on several platforms, such as Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and so forth. Pinterest tended to say, “So CUTE I want to die” (with a few boards collecting sad stories). On Google Plus the results for “want to die” mostly brought up posts about animals in shelters scheduled for euthanasia. There were a few on each of Facebook and Twitter, but they tended to be mostly people using the phrase lightly for purposes of emphasis and drama, and more important, they rarely if ever show up in a normal Twitter stream. You have to go out explicitly hunting for them, as I did for this screenshot.

TRIGGER: Twitter Search: "want to die"

Once you shift over to the anonymous social media services, like Post-Secret, Secret, 6 Billion Secrets, and Whisper, it’s a different story. You can hardly turn around without tripping over a post that expresses some sort of suicidal thoughts or other emotional trauma, or worse, posts fantasizing about hurting other people. When I check Whisper, I’ll often see posts like those at the head of this blogpost, with timestamps of “1 minute ago” “46 seconds ago” and so on. The vulnerable posts can elicit comments ranging from heartfelt support to vicious attacks, which is a bit part of why the creator of Post-Secret shut down that app. My experience came on Whisper. Here are a couple other links showing some Whisper content.


Ashley Beckner: Whisper App Confessions: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=haTbJrwDnYM

13 Eye-Opening Confessions From Men In Abusive Relationships http://www.buzzfeed.com/rachelzarrell/13-eye-opening-confessions-about-the-male-victims-of-domesti?bftw&utm_term=4ldqpfp#u9lop

16 Heartbreaking Anonymous Secrets: The anonymity afforded by Whisper often means we get a harrowing, intimate view of people’s daily struggles. http://www.buzzfeed.com/alanwhite/16-heartbreaking-anonymous-secrets#u9lop

In last night’s Twitter chat, some of the issues that came up included:
– challenges with the ethical underpinnings of anonymous social media services;
– challenges on anonymous services to find out where the person is, gender, other identifiers for rescuers;
– the idea that calling 911 for help for a person is a breach of community standards (like ‘narcing’ in drug culture);
– geographic challenges in locating assistance when the person is in a different country;
– different cultural standards for appropriate response to suicidal intent;
– legal challenges when the service refuses to identify the anonymous suicidal user except to police in the country of origin for the service (and not in the country of residence for the suicidal person);
– and much more.

Here are some of the tweets from last night’s chat.

Radiation Oncology Journal Club (#RadOnc) – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of September 29, 2014)

Screenshot of article's abstract.

JAMA: Use of and mortality after bilateral mastectomy … http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1900512

I’ve previously mentioned medical journal clubs on Twitter. Today I wanted to show some of what happens in the real conversation. The Radiation Oncology Journal Club (#RadOnc) has a very accessible model for managing the journal club and making it easy to engage in the conversation. After all, they know how busy doctors really are, and what scheduling is like. The journal club runs over the entire weekend. The conversation isn’t exactly synchronous (same time) or asynchronous (whenever), but rather semi-synchronous, a loosely defined time period where you can gather with friends and colleagues, but people tend to wander in and out of the conversation. However, it’s an international party, so you will hear comparisons about treatment standards in different parts of the world. They’ve explicitly stated that the journal club is bilingual, English/Spanish/Español, so there’s that to make it interesting (challenging) as well. Sometimes they are lucky, and can get the authors of the paper to step in and answer questions. One of the other quirky things about doing this on Twitter is that, even though the conversation is mostly other radiation oncologists and doctors, there are interested patients who come in and ask questions or share thoughts, concerns, and insights. It can be a great educational tool on both sides!

Patients on the Right TEDMED Questions – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of September 22, 2014)

Role of the patient: How do we empower patients to make healthier decisions? What is the patient's role from his or her perspective? What is the role of healthy people (non-patients) in healthcare?

TEDMED Great Challenges: Role of the Patient (photo by Dr. Nick Dawson)

Last week, we talked about the trend toward patient engagement in events that may have previously been focused almost exclusively on medical professionals. A spin off from that rich conversation was when the patient advocates began to question what are the right questions to be asking about patient engagement. Even more impressive, TEDMED was sometimes asking if they have the right questions, so this is a conversation valued from several perspectives.

What I’m observing, however, is a sense of not being included on the part of patients, and a strong need for greater engagement by patients in the process by which TEDMED develops their questions and Great Challenges. Just in case there are those who aren’t aware of this, TEDMED has an online community space where these matters are discussed. Anyone can create an account and ID for participating in this conversation. Know someone you think should be participating? Ask they if they’ve joined, or better yet, invite them.

TEDMED: Great Challenges: http://www.tedmed.com/greatchallenges

TEDMED: Account Creation: https://www.tedmed.com/accounts/login?redirectto=%2Fgreatchallenges&ref=account-login

Here are some of the tweets from that tangential conversation, beginning with the one that started it all.

New Hashtag, Nursing Ethics – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of August 25, 2014)

SL09: SLUM: Nursing Class

There is never a shortage of great healthcare hashtags, chats, events, etcetera on Twitter, and new ones appear all the time. Nursing Ethics is an emerging hashtag which is a regular Twitter chat, but gained special attention over the past week with the Nursing Ethics Summit. There is a very active and engaged nursing community on Twitter, much of it centered around #NurseUp. The Twitter nursing community is of value for talking about professional concerns and sharing professional articles and information, problems and solutions, with a great deal of potential for nursing education. Here are just a few highlights from this newest addition to the nursing hashtags.

#MakeHealth was AMAZING – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of August 18, 2014)

It’s always a delight to have the opportunity to show off a University of Michigan event in these posts. It’s even more of a delight to show off an event of which I was so intimately a part, even though I have to confess I feel like I did very little and it was the community that really drove this magical event! I was just lucky to be among the core team at the front, along with the incredible Joyce Lee and Emily Hirshfeld! There are so very many incredible people who were involved I can’t possible thank them all.

One thing you’ll notice in these tweets is the range of media included — many photos and videos that may or may not display. To get a more engaging sense of the event as displayed in the tweets you may need to click through.

WANT MORE?

Using Twitter to Counteract Hype, Part 2 – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of August 11, 2014)

CDC Combats Ebola Hype with Twitter Chat August 8, 2014

Last week, I showed you some of the ways in which the healthcare community is using Twitter to combat hype and misinformation about Ebola. This week there is a more specific example of the same idea — how the Centers for Disease Control scheduled a Twitter chat to answer questions in public for clinicians and healthcare providers about the Ebola outbreak in Africa.

There are some surprises in this collection. Some surprising questions, some surprising answers, and sometimes the surprise is in who is doing the answering. The conversation around bleach is especially interesting. Also, notice who is retweeting what the CDC says. This is a small sampling, but many many people passing along the information, and this is important for spreading the word.

THANK YOU, CDC


Using Twitter to Counteract Hype (#Ebola) – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of August 4, 2014)

Ebola virionsEbola virus particles
From Wikimedia Commons: Ebola virions; Ebola virus particles

In the last week, I don’t think there has been a moment when the trending hashtags display on my Twitter page has NOT listed “Ebola.” This is in part due to the attention resulting from two American healthcare providers having been infected with the Ebola virus while providing care, and partly also from the newest update from WHO on the outbreak in West Africa, which lists over 1500 cases and almost 900 deaths. People are panicking, and the press is going wild. This is a great opportunity to show how healthcare professionals and the broader healthcare Twitter community is using the #Ebola hashtag to help alleviate concerns and moderate anxiety, by providing informed balanced reliable information. Each of the tweets included in this post is considered a popular tweet which has already been retweeted several times and/or favorited by people reading the tweet. If you want to help calm things down, you might consider retweeting or sharing some of these popular tweets on the topic.

lores Ebola Zaire CDC Photo
From Wikimedia Commons: Ebola case #3, 1976

Pubmed is LIVE on Social Media – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of July 21, 2014)

Pubmed Social Media Icons
PubMed Update: Social Media Icons Added. NLM Tech Bull. 2014 Jul-Aug;(399):b2. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/techbull/ja14/brief/ja14_pm_social_media_icons.html

Have you been straddling the fence deciding whether or not social media is “a thing” in healthcare? Well, maybe this will tip the balance. Pubmed now includes social media sharing icons at the article level, as shown in the image above. This is in addition to NIH’s own active life on social media. Unfortunately, when I was testing it out, every now and then what it shared was not the link to the article, but a link to the search strategy from which I found the articles. Hopefully, they’ll get that fixed, but usually it was good. Here’s what it looks like when sharing something to Twitter.

Pubmed Social Media Sharing Example: Twitter

In honor of this noteworthy change, I thought I’d divert from actual hashtags to seeing what people are sharing from Pubmed this week. If you really want hashtags, take a look at what hashtags they are ADDING to the posts, since Pubmed doesn’t automatically add any.

Trust & Health Information in Social Media – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of July 14, 2014)

BBC Radio4: Reith Lectures 2002: Onora O'Neill, Trust

The question of trust is not a new one — who we trust, how we trust, why we trust. All of these are known to be critical in healthcare, even more so now that we have the Internet and social media. In last’s evening’s #HCSM Twitter chat, a group of patients and doctors debated portions of this question. No new answers or solutions appeared, but there were some provocative statements and perspectives.

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