Video Games For the Win!

Video Games and Learning...it's not an oxymoron, it's real life.  In fact, I TAed an undergraduate course with this exact title at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  UW-Madison is also home to the Games, Learning and Society Organization and this fall, offered its first Coursera course on Video Games and Learning which many of my former … Continue reading Video Games For the Win!

New public health MeSH terms for 2014

Each year, PubMed adds, changes, & deletes terms in the Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) database, which contains all the terms used to index articles in Medline.  I'm always excited (yes, really!) to see what new terms are available for public health, since that makes searching so much easier & accurate.  I've gathered a list of the new terms … Continue reading New public health MeSH terms for 2014

Applying comparative effectiveness research to individuals

From the Health Affairs Blog: A comparative effectiveness research (CER) study shows that surgery is better than medical treatment for a particular cardiac condition. My patient is 78 years old and has complicated diabetes. – does the study apply? Another patient 48 years old and otherwise healthy. Does it apply here? Can the overall results … Continue reading Applying comparative effectiveness research to individuals

PubMed Commons: New Space for Discussion among Researchers

Earlier this week, NCBI announced the released a pilot of PubMed Commons, a feature that enables commenting on article abstracts by researchers. According to the NCBI blog, the new feature is in response to requests by the scientific community. Their goal is to encourage constructive criticism and discussion of scientific issues. For now, PubMed Commons is … Continue reading PubMed Commons: New Space for Discussion among Researchers

Request for Information for NIH

Even though the government is currently shut down, there are some outstanding Request for Information (RFI) notices out there for which the National Institutes of Health are seeking public comments.  These RFIs provide opportunities for you to have your comments and thoughts heard on specific topics, so let your voice be heard.  Here are some … Continue reading Request for Information for NIH

Our Stone Age Bodies in a Modern World

We all know we're supposed to eat sweets sparingly, but the CRAVING is still there. It can be unstoppable, and NPR Books just published an article that explains the cause from an evolutionary biological perspective.In short, our Paleolithic bodies were trained to crave sugars because they were a quick energy supply that wasn't usually available. … Continue reading Our Stone Age Bodies in a Modern World

In Honor of Breaking Bad: A Look at Crystals at UM

One of my favorite television series ever ended Sunday night.  Breaking Bad was a show about chemistry, change, and of course, crystals. In honor of Breaking Bad, I thought I'd highlight some of the work being done at the University of Michigan with crystals.  The Center for Structural Biology provides crystallography services for researchers at Michigan … Continue reading In Honor of Breaking Bad: A Look at Crystals at UM

October 11 Training Session by Bioinformatics Core

The Bioinformatics Core is a unique piece of the Department of Computational Medicine & Bioinformatics which "provides computing, data infrastructure, and bioinformatics analysis to support research activities".  In this upcoming session on October 11th from 10:00AM-11:30AM, they will share methods for interpreting the computing and bioinformatic analysis provided based on your samples. Title:  Resources for … Continue reading October 11 Training Session by Bioinformatics Core