Redesign the EMR

Are you a designer? Do you just hate the current way that the electronic medical record is viewed (particularly, the text-only Blue Button from Veteran’s Affairs)?

Then you might want to hibernate with your computer for the next couple of days as you redesign the electronic medical record (EMR) for a cash prize, and you know, the benefits of moving health forward via meaningful technologies.

Image from healthdesign.challenge.gov

Created by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, and with cash incentive prizes ranging from $1,000 to $16,000 from the philanthropic organization The Designer Fund, this is definitely a challenge to keep an eye on, if not participate in.

Designs could impact MyHealtheVet, the patient-facing portal for veterans and their families to access medical data.

Here’s every resource you need about the competition:

  • The official White House Challenge page for the competition
  • The GitHub/Blue Button page, full of useful information like the reviewer panel for the challenge, and online inspiration resources like TedMed lectures and examples of successful medical redesign efforts.
  • The obligatory Tech Crunch article covering the challenge.

Submissions are required to be licensed under Creative Commons (Veteran’s Affairs has a long tradition of open access resources – VistA anyone?). Deadline for design submissions is November 30th – have at it!

What is Open Access?

Open Access (OA) Week has passed, but we like to encourage people to continue to learn and understand the concept.  OA can be confusing, and so PhD Comics has partnered with The Scholarly Publishing & Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) to produce a video,  What is Open Access?, to help us all understand it better…

An OA definition supported by SPARC is the one from The Budapest Open Access Initiative and reads as follow: “By open access, we mean its immediate, free availability on the public internet, permitting any users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search or link to the full text of these articles, crawl them for indexing, pass them as data to software or use them for any other lawful purpose…”

You know that OA is my soapbox issue.  I believe that information is the single most empowering commodity on the face of this earth.  Making it available to everyone regardless of race, religion, socioeconomic status or any other characteristic you can think to name here can only be a good thing…  So it’s worth knowing more about how to make information available to everyone.  My two cents.

 

 

Unofficially Extending Open Access Week

Open Access Week may be over, but we’re not quite done with it yet!

Open Access BMJ

BMJ image courtesy Guilia Forsythe (2012) CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 and open access lock logo from openaccessweek.org CC-BY

Today we bring you a list of open access medical journals that you can find in addition to the articles in PMC (the database formerly known as PubMed Central):

  • Directory of Open Access Journals (aka DOAJ)
  • Open Science Directory medicine subject search

This list comes courtesy of one of our phenomenal staff members, Steph Gertken, who sends out a compiled summary of the discussion on the medical libraries listserv.

Copyright @ UM (in brief)

One of the best things I heard during this week’s Open Access events came from University of Michigan’s Associate General Counsel, Jack Bernard:

Copyright doesn’t graft well onto – what’s that term? Oh, yeah – reality.

In the spirit of Open Access Week 2012, this post will highlight key points from Melissa Levine and Jack Bernard’s presentation, What’s in it for You? The U-M Copyright Policy (Standard Practice Guide 601.28) from Tuesday, October 23, 2012.

In September 2011 U of M adopted some changes to its copyright policy – while the policy remains philosophically the same, the revisions are meant to clarify old points.

Namely, “faculty control the copyright associated with their scholarly works – articles, monographs, books. The real innovation…is that the University accepts responsibility for archiving and preserving the scholarly work of all faculty.

Think of it as a pie (credit where credit is due – Jack used this metaphor).

Pite FTW!!!

“Pie FTW!!!” © 2009 by Jay Shouldol CC-BY 2.0 I’ve added the captions, since the CC BY license lets you adapt the original work. I think I’ll retitle this “CC FTW!”

Faculty, and University employees (including students employed by the University) keep most of the copyright to their own work – but a slice of that stays with the University. That slice is the preservation part – the University can archive work in a repository like Deep Blue (with limits on access – it wouldn’t necessarily be open for the world to see).

Ultimately, the whole point of the University’s copyright policy is to promote the academic enterprise, not stifle it.

There is a good overview of who owns the copyright in scholarly works here.

That said, copyright is dicey, and the devil is in the details. If you have questions about those devilish details, contact the Copyright Office at copyright@umich.edu or Melissa Levine, the Lead Copyright Officer, directly at mslevine@umich.edu. Onward, scholarly pursuits!

Open Access Week is Here!

Did you miss the Open Access Week events earlier in the week? Fear not! There are still plenty of resources out there!

Open Access Logo

Friday, October 26th, from 1:30 to 3:30 the regularly scheduled “Fun Friday @ 2435 North Quad will be transformed into a Get CC Savvy workshop using resources from the School of Open and P2PU. Learn more here.

Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society has a wiki page on good OA policies.

Are you a librarian? There is a guide from Earlham College on what you specifically can do to promote open access.

Are you faculty? You can definitely promote open access too, and there’s also a guide!

Creative Commons has a slew of online and in-person activities slated for the week.

See what the internet is buzzing about by taking a peek at the official hashtag, #OAWeek2012.

As an open data evangelist at the World Bank notes, “May your research be freely accessible and your data easily re-usable”!

 

Funding Pulse – October

Welcome to a new monthly series, Funding Pulse (as you may well have guessed from the title), in which I’ll highlight current news in biomedical and health funding. In the future, you can find all Funding Pulse stories under the eponymous category.

October’s pieces are courtesy of the University Record:

Disease advocacy has changed how medical research is funded:

To get funding, your science has to be sound, sure, but the patients with the disease you’re studying need to tell their stories as well. A recent study from U of M’s Sociology Department found that federal funding (from the Department of Defense and National Institute of Health) “began to think of patients with particular diseases as the recipients of the research funds” when there were strong advocacy organizations involved with particular diseases.

U-M, Sloan Foundation to enhance open access to research data:

In partnership with U of M’s Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research at the Institute for Social Research,

Funding from the Sloan Foundation will enable ICPSR to work with “editors of peer-reviewed social science journals, leaders of data repositories and research funding agencies to foster new standards in research transparency, data citation and sustainable funding models for open access to data,” with focal areas including:

        • standardized citations of research data
        • journal guidelines for including data (for replication)
        • interdisciplinary collaboration through sustainably-funded repositories

Interestingly enough, the last point is the result of increased federal emphasis on data transparency and management – notably the National Science Foundation’s requirement that all incoming grant proposals have a data management plan that addresses – in detail – how data will be stored, and ultimately shared.

 

Not All Open Access is Created Equal

I didn’t know much about open access prior to my tenure at the University of Michigan – and even once arriving here, the reason I learned as much as I did was through the efforts of amazing on-campus organizations such as Open.Michigan and their efforts at education and awareness. That backstory out of the way, I’m fully aware that unless you happen to seek this information out, a lot of the minute details (let alone the big-picture concepts) of open access can remain hazy.

That’s why I was so excited to learn about the draft publication – a concise flyer, really – A Guide to Understanding the Core Components of OA (pictured below).

open access guide

Draft of A Guide to Understanding the Core Elements of OA

The guide is a collaboration between the Public Library of Science (PLoS), the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC), and the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association to “provide an easily understandable,  comprehensive, and quantifiable resource to help authors make informed decisions on where to publish based on publisher policies.” Read the full statement on SPARC’s blog.

This trio is aiming to have the document finalized by Open Access Week (October 22-28th, 2012), and in the true spirit of the cause, is asking for public input! Read the draft document (I found the chart on the bottom to be particularly enlightening) and send in your comments here. A plea to those new to open access – you’re probably the most important audience here, so send in your thoughts!! Is anything unclear, can anything be better articulated? Share your thoughts!

Comments close at 5 pm (EST) on Monday, October 8, 2012. 

 

Open Access Biomed Images

A beta launch from the National Library of Medicine, Open-i, lets you search across the full-text collections of PubMed Central for open access images. Although only in beta, Open-i has the potential to become a very powerful information retrieval tool, since image results return not only images, but also the abstract, author affiliations, bottom line results, and the MEDLINE citation.

Another useful feature suggests similar images based on the one you’re looking at. NLM projects initial images to number approximately 600,000 with the hope that the resource will scale to the order of millions!

To find additional open access content, check out the library’s open access research guide, profiled in an earlier post.

Open Educational Resources

What are Open Educational Resources (OER)?

  • Open Education “…is the simple and powerful idea that the world’s knowledge is a public good and that technology in general and the Worldwide Web in particular provide an extraordinary opportunity for everyone to share, use, and reuse knowledge.” —The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation
  • “Open educational resources (OER) are learning materials that are freely available for use, remixing and redistribution.” –Wikipedia

 

 

A great writeup by Open.Michigan about our collaboration!

THL [Taubman Health Sciences Library] is the first library at the University of Michigan to contribute staff-created content to Open.Michigan’s collection of resources.This partnership enables the material produced by THL to be used faster and better by its constituents and fosters the creation of stronger, more effective materials by encouraging collaboration and innovation around teaching materials on a global scale. By partnering with Open.Michigan, THL is able to share and promote its content to a wider audience of collaborators, educators, and self-learners for legal use and reuse worldwide; streamline submission of library-produced content into Deep Blue, the University’s institutional repository; and position themselves as an advocate at the University and in the broader library community for improved information sharing through better understanding and use of openly licensed content.

In the first year of this partnership, we laid a strong foundation for continuing to work with the THL team to build open content together. You can see the resources we published last year online at http://open.umich.edu/education/mlibrary/thl.

One highlight of our contributions is the section on systematic reviews. THL partners with members of the University of Michigan health sciences community to provide extensive literature search support for systematic review and clinical practice guideline projects. To view our presentation materials visit: http://open.umich.edu/education/mlibrary/thl/systematic-review/2012/materials

THL partnership will also provide presentation and teaching materials focusing on global health to students, scholars and researchers around the world.  View global health presentation materials at  http://open.umich.edu/education/mlibrary/thl/global-health/2012/materials and continue to check back as additional items are added.

Expanding Open Access – the White House should be Listening

Open Access Lock logo

Image courtesy of openaccessweek.org distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution License

Open access got a huge boost last week when UCSF reported that its faculty senate had voted  unanimously to adopt an open access policy toward its research publications, making it the first public university to do so.  Last month, Harvard library told its university faculty that they were breaking the bank with digital subscriptions.

On the heels of these massive developments, there is also an ongoing petition on the White House petitions website that supports expanding the mandate for publicly funded research to be published in open access journals. Signatures on this petition demonstrate a commitment to bringing research results out from behind paywalls, much as the NIH Public Access policy has been doing since 2008.

Authored by Access2Research, the full text of the petition (a quick 2 paragraphs) show the aims of free access to articles are to harness the power of the internet and “speed the research process and increase the return on our investment in scientific research”.

The petition has until June 20th to garner 25,000 signatures, which elicits a response from the Obama administration. As of this morning the petition is up to 22,635 signatures – meaning that only a couple thousand more are needed. It’s time to rally the social networks!