Funding Pulse – October

Welcome to a new monthly series, Funding Pulse (as you may well have guessed from the title), in which I’ll highlight current news in biomedical and health funding. In the future, you can find all Funding Pulse stories under the eponymous category.

October’s pieces are courtesy of the University Record:

Disease advocacy has changed how medical research is funded:

To get funding, your science has to be sound, sure, but the patients with the disease you’re studying need to tell their stories as well. A recent study from U of M’s Sociology Department found that federal funding (from the Department of Defense and National Institute of Health) “began to think of patients with particular diseases as the recipients of the research funds” when there were strong advocacy organizations involved with particular diseases.

U-M, Sloan Foundation to enhance open access to research data:

In partnership with U of M’s Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research at the Institute for Social Research,

Funding from the Sloan Foundation will enable ICPSR to work with “editors of peer-reviewed social science journals, leaders of data repositories and research funding agencies to foster new standards in research transparency, data citation and sustainable funding models for open access to data,” with focal areas including:

        • standardized citations of research data
        • journal guidelines for including data (for replication)
        • interdisciplinary collaboration through sustainably-funded repositories

Interestingly enough, the last point is the result of increased federal emphasis on data transparency and management – notably the National Science Foundation’s requirement that all incoming grant proposals have a data management plan that addresses – in detail – how data will be stored, and ultimately shared.

 

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