World Malaria Day 2014: Vector-borne Disease on the Global Health Agenda

This Friday, April 25 is World Malaria Day, a fitting followup to this year’s World Health Day focus on “vector-borne disease”. Malaria, as a vector-borne disease, is in a class with: chagas disease, chikungunya, Congo-Crimean haemorragic fever, dengue, dracuncuiasis, human African trypanosomiasis, leishmaniaisis, lymphatic filariasis, lyme disease, onchocerciasis, shistosomiasis and yellow fever. Don’t feel bad if you don’t know much about these diseases, you can follow the link in the previous sentence, or check them out on GIDEON for more information. Independent from other vector borne diseases, malaria’s prevalence and morbidity/mortality burden worldwide is decreasing, but still surprisingly large:

“207 million estimated cases of malaria in 2012

627 000 deaths caused by malaria in 2012″

A woman putting up a mosquito bednet, United Republic of Tanzania.

A woman putting up a mosquito bednet, United Republic of Tanzania.

While researchers and medical/public health professionals worldwide are working to generate evidence-based approaches, awareness, funding and sustainable solutions to combat malaria, faculty and staff right here at the University of Michigan are also contributing to the solution. Please take a moment to check your calendars and consider attending this event:

World Malaria Day 2014 Forum

Friday, April 25, 20141:00 – 5:00 pm EDT

 University of Michigan Union, Pendleton Room

This forum, co-sponsored by the William Davidson Institute and University of Michigan’s Global Reach and Global Heath programs, welcomes anyone interested:
ALL ARE WELCOME, especially students, academics, health-care professionals, business community, and governmental and non-governmental organizations interested in the latest advancements in malaria research occurring locally and globally.

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