Pubmed is LIVE on Social Media – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of July 21, 2014)

Pubmed Social Media Icons
PubMed Update: Social Media Icons Added. NLM Tech Bull. 2014 Jul-Aug;(399):b2. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/techbull/ja14/brief/ja14_pm_social_media_icons.html

Have you been straddling the fence deciding whether or not social media is “a thing” in healthcare? Well, maybe this will tip the balance. Pubmed now includes social media sharing icons at the article level, as shown in the image above. This is in addition to NIH’s own active life on social media. Unfortunately, when I was testing it out, every now and then what it shared was not the link to the article, but a link to the search strategy from which I found the articles. Hopefully, they’ll get that fixed, but usually it was good. Here’s what it looks like when sharing something to Twitter.

Pubmed Social Media Sharing Example: Twitter

In honor of this noteworthy change, I thought I’d divert from actual hashtags to seeing what people are sharing from Pubmed this week. If you really want hashtags, take a look at what hashtags they are ADDING to the posts, since Pubmed doesn’t automatically add any.

Trust & Health Information in Social Media – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of July 14, 2014)

BBC Radio4: Reith Lectures 2002: Onora O'Neill, Trust

The question of trust is not a new one — who we trust, how we trust, why we trust. All of these are known to be critical in healthcare, even more so now that we have the Internet and social media. In last’s evening’s #HCSM Twitter chat, a group of patients and doctors debated portions of this question. No new answers or solutions appeared, but there were some provocative statements and perspectives.

Fatigue in Healthcare – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of July 7, 2014)

Asleep in the Library

Each week the Healthcare Leaders chat (#HCLDR) is fabulous, covering relevant fascinating topics of great interest to me. I can’t highlight them every week, but I am often tempted to do so. This one was huge — how do we manage fatigue when it impacts on doctors, nurses, residents, students?

Keeping Patients in the Dark – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of June 30, 2014)

The legal and ethical implications of KEEPING PATIENTS IN THE DARK
Summer Institute for Informed Patient Choice: The legal and ethical implications of keeping patients in the dark: http://siipc.org/

You shape your Twitter experience through who you choose to follow. Everything else derives from this — the tweets you see, the suggestions for people to follow, the hashtags listed as trending, all of it. For me, by far the majority of the people I follow are somehow connected to healthcare. Last week the hashtag that was vibrating through my Twitter feed was #SIIP14, which turned out to be for a biannual event on patient choice held at Dartmouth College. From what I was seeing, it sure looked as if they had some exceptional speakers and great conversations. There was also ONE particular tweet and slide that seemed to sum up the most important thoughts of the conference, on how to tell the difference between “informed consent” and “shared decision making.” Trust me, if the image doesn’t show up in the embedded tweet below, you really need to click through and see this one.

The discussion centered around that one tweet was rather insightful, especially with respect to how “informed consent” may be perceived by actual patients. Here are just a few selections (excluding some of the strong language that accompanied people’s passionate responses).

That side conversation is, however, only part of the exceptional thoughts that circulated through #SIIPC14. Historic context, overdiagnosis, the child’s view of the doctor, unwanted surgeries, access to information and research articles, respecting the accommodation needs of patients who attend healthcare events (and when is the doctor a patient?), with much more.

Note – in this image, the doctor is the one with their back to the rest of the room, typing away furiously on the computer.


ABOUT INFORMED CONSENT IN SURGERY


INFORMATION ACCESS AND PATIENTS


ACCOMMODATIONS


OTHER HIGH POINTS

Make Health Fest Coming August 16!

Detroit Maker Faire 2013#UMSIMakerfest !!!Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013
Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2014Detroit Maker Faire 2013
Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2014Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2014Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013

We Make Health Fest
Saturday, Aug 16th, 2014
University of Michigan
Palmer Commons, Great Lakes Rooms

Short Description
“A collaborative event for a local and virtual community interested in health, technology, and participatory design. Join us for a full day of health themed design and maker activities!”

Longer Description
Many types of events are being triggered by the creativity of the Maker Movement — maker faires, mini-maker faires, maker camps, maker festivals, maker fests and makerfests, make-a-thons and createathons (also spelled makeathon or makethon), open make events, maker madness events, maker shows — and they come in all sizes, flavors, and themes. What does that mean? Think of it as a mash-up of science fair PLUS Hands On Museum or Exploratorium PLUS do it yourself! It’s all about learning and creating and problemsolving through a combination of Show+Tell+Do! Here at the University of Michigan, many people on campus are partnering on taking the “maker culture” energy and applying it through a lens focused on health to promote participatory and collaborative strategies in healthcare. Come, have fun, learn, make stuff, but more than that, meet other interesting and creative people who are interested in using what they have, know, and can do to Make Health!

Learn More!

Make Health: http://makehealth.us/
Twitter: @MakeHealthUM
Google Plus: Make Health UM

A project of HealthDesignBy.Us
Twitter: @HealthByUs
Blog: Introducing @HealthByUs

We Make Health

On Making Health – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of June 24, 2014)

White House Tweet on Maker Faire

#MakeHealth, #MakerNurse, #MedLibs, and #NationOfMakers lead off this week’s highlighted hashtags. What they all have in common is connections between maker culture and making health. What is maker culture? Funny you should ask.


White House Maker Faire
The White House had its first ever Maker Faire last week, June 18th. Their hashtag was #NationOfMakers. While the White House didn’t focus solely on health, health was well represented in their audience and presenters.

#NationOfMakers #MakeHealth


We Make Health

University of Michigan is really active in this space, enough so that the topic could be a whole series of posts on its own. Let’s just start with the fact that University of Michigan is sponsoring our own maker festival in August explicitly focused on connecting health, research, clinical care, patients, and maker culture. Our hashtag for this event and going on is #makehealth.


MakerNurse

Work on that event has lead to a lot of questions and thoughts from other medical librarians, which led to a Twitter chat about #makehealth and #NationOfMakers and all that under the hashtag #medlibs and joined by the folks from #MakerNurse!

“What is the Maker Movement, and how does it connect to participatory medicine and personalized healthcare? How is this changing healthcare? How is this changing libraries? How does this connect to the roots of health and healthcare? What are roles for libraries in ‘makering’?”


What will you be making? Help us make health!

World Refugee Day

“On World Refugee Day, I call on the international community to intensify efforts to prevent and resolve conflicts, and to help achieve peace and security so that families can be reunited and refugees can return home.”

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon

Unfortunately, a day doesn’t go by when we don’t encounter the brutality of individuals and families fleeing their homes in fear of persecution. The UNHCR global trends report released today notes that 51.2 million were forcibly displaced at the end of 2013, and that 25,300 asylum applications were from unaccompanied or separated children in 77 countries.

Image

On World Refugee Day, we wanted to point you to resources to help you find health related refugee information.

  • Refugee Health Information Network is a “national collaborative partnership that has created a database of quality multilingual, public health resources for those providing care to resettled refugees and asylees” and provides health education and provider tools.
  • MLibrary Research Guides on Global Health and Refugees and Migration can steer you to a wide range of journal articles, government documents, NGO content, and other resources for your refugee-related research.

Finally, be sure to spend a moment looking UNHCR refugee stories, where you can view the individual impact of displacement.

ONC Partners with Dr. Oz to Spread the Word (#BlueButton) — Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of June 16, 2014)

BlueButton on Twitter

The Blue Button was some of the biggest buzz at Health Data Palooza. Following #hdpalooza, the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology partnered with the famous and popular media personality, Dr. Oz through his affiliated service, ShareCare, to co-sponsor a Twitter chat about the Blue Button and what it can do for the American people. For those who haven’t already heard, the Blue Button is a tool for accessing your personal health records.

I’m taking this opportunity to also show you some special Twitter search features and how they work. Today, I’ll cluster the examples by type of search, and in Part 2, I’ll show how to do these special searches.

REGULAR SEARCH

SEARCH PHOTOS

SEARCH VIDEOS

SEARCH NEWS

SEARCH LINKS

Freezing Patients Back to Life: Fact & Fiction

I recently finished The Curiosity , a fictional narrative about the discovery and “reanimation” of a century old frozen man.  Along the way, the researchers involved in this breakthrough have to grapple with the ethical choices of bringing this man back to life.  Yes, there is a romantic story line too but more often than not, this narrative focuses on the consequences of our decisions and how they affect us and others.

In Pittsburgh, PA, emergency room doctors are trying to save patient lives by replicating The Curiosity’s protagonist freezing process, to a lesser degree.  Only patients who come to the ER with “ ‘catastrophic penetrating trauma’ and who have lost so much blood that they have gone into cardiac arrest” will be eligible for participation in this Department of Defense clinical trial.  Doctors will replace the patient’s blood with freezing saltwater, inducing hypothermia, in the hopes of providing more time to triage wounds and prevent death.

Each time they do, they will be stepping into a scientific void. Ethicists say it’s reasonable to presume most people would want to undergo the experimental procedure when the alternative is almost certain death. But no one can be sure of the outcome.

I wonder about the review these doctors would give The Curiosity.

AMA Code of Medical Ethics (1850) Book Cover (Public Domain) Retrieved from National Library of Medicine Digital Collections

AMA Code of Medical Ethics (1850) Book Cover (Public Domain) Retrieved from National Library of Medicine Digital Collections

UM Plays a Part in National News Around #CerebralPalsySwagger — Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of June 9, 2014)

The Cerebral Palsy Swagger
Cerebral Palsy Swagger: https://www.facebook.com/cerebralpalsyswagger

It doesn’t happen that often that a Twitter hashtag about health blows up into a national news story, and even less often that this will happen with an event hinged around the University of Michigan! Many thanks to my colleague Anna Schnitzer for bringing this to my attention, and please excuse us if this post is a little more “feel good” than usual. The story is about two brothers, Hunter and Braden Gandee, who went on a journey last weekend to raise awareness about cerebral palsy. 7-yr-old Braden was carried by his 14-yr-old brother, Hunter, for 40 miles, from the Michigan-Ohio border to the University of Michigan Bahna Wrestling Center in Ann Arbor. The news loved it, beginning with local stories (M-Go Blue, and MLive), then taking off across the US, from the Detroit Free Press to Fox News, NBC News, People Magazine, the Today Show, and even ESPN and Canada! And here comes the buzz from Twitter (mostly pictures, with reactions from real people around the country).