Global Innovation – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of October 20, 2014)

Cool Toys pics of the day: Engelbart Mural

Last week has been rich with ideas for innovation on Twitter, this time with a national and international flavor. Just walking through a sampler of examples from several different conversations (AMA’s Equity Chat, the bioethics Twitter collaboration with the ASBH annual conference, international open access week, and capping the list with the BBC’s World Changing Ideas Summit).


EquityChat

I was riding the train home from Iowa, having visited my very ill father and feeling a tad distraught and fragmented, then stumbled into the AMA’s Equity Chat without a clue it was even happening. It just showed up in my stream, and I joined in. What a great chat about how to shift medical education toward a more diverse and inclusive community, and how doing so will benefit society at large, small communities, marginalized groups, and ultimately everyone.


BIOETHX + ASBH14 = ASBH14 BIOETHX

Not that I haven’t seen this before, but shouldn’t EVERY major conference partner with a topically affiliated Twitter chat community during the conference to help engage a broader community in discussing the issues and pushing out important information and findings presented at the conference? We talk about translational medicine, but isn’t this a fundamental strategy for communicating core fundings to the audiences most likely to disseminate and implement them? Anyway, so the bioethics weekly chat teamed up with the American Society of Bioethics and Humanities for their annual meeting this week. I guarantee that a LOT more people noticed the conference than would have otherwise!


Open Access Week

While open access is not, right now, this year, a brand new shiny idea, it is still very much novelty historically and absolutely pivotal in promoting and supporting innovation. That was a big part of why the University of Michigan invited Jack Andraka to be the keynote speaker for our own Open Access Week events with the theme of Generation Open. These tweets are not just from Jack’s presentation, though, but also from other innovations taking place as part of OAW.


Ada Lovelace Day 2014 (ALD14)

The Equity Chat and Open Access Week both emphasize equality, diversity, and accessibility as essential components of innovation and positive change. Thus, it makes sense to also include tweets from the Ada Lovelace Day events, focused on awareness of women’s contributions to science and creating a vision of science practice that is inclusive of women and engaging to young women. And, speaking of innovation approaches, anyone else notice the incredible creativity and artistry of the efforts in this area? Wow!


World Changing Ideas Summit

I was so excited to discover the BBC’s new (hopefully annual) initiative to promote innovation and awareness of innovation: World Changing Ideas Summit. Aside from the tweets below, check out their collection of great posts and videos.

Local Innovation & #MCubed – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of October 13, 2014)

MCubed Symposium
MCubed Symposium 2014: http://mcubed.umich.edu/mcubed_2014/index.html

Last week saw the second annual MCubed Symposium. For those who aren’t aware of MCubed already, here is a little background about this fabulously creative approach to funding and fostering innovation and collaboration at the University of Michigan.


MCubed – The University of Michigan’s revolutionary new way to fund research http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=akBGSlFn9nQ

Eventually there will be videos up for this year’s presentations (schedule), like there were last year, but for now you’ll have to settle for some tweets to introduce the high points.

Open Access Journal on Clinical Diabetes and Endocrinology

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Through a unique publishing collaboration, the University of Michigan and BioMed Central have launched a new open access journal, Clinical Diabetes and Endocrinology, which is now seeking submissions and set to begin publishing in the first quarter of 2015. The journal is led by Editor-in-Chief Meng H. Tan, Professor of Internal Medicine in the Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology, and Diabetes at the University of Michigan.

Dr. Tan states, “Clinical Diabetes and Endocrinology aims to promote better care for people with diabetes and endocrine diseases by sharing with their health professionals new research and clinical knowledge on various aspects of their diseases. This collaborative academic-private initiative will make the new knowledge readily, freely, and immediately accessible to these health professionals worldwide so it can have a global impact.”

Jasna Markovac, Senior Director, Learning Design and Publishingor Medical School Information Services (MSIS), explains, “The University of Michigan has a history of emphasizing the importance of open scholarship, open access, and open publishing. We encourage faculty to publish in open access journals, but there are very few high quality, reputable ones in the medical field. So the Medical School decided to explore launching a series of open journals in an effort to provide for our faculty, staff and students more alternatives to the traditional subscription-based journals.”

Around the same time, BioMed Central approached Peter Arvan, Division Chief for Metabolism, Endocrinology, and Diabetes, and Director of the Michigan Comprehensive Diabetes Center, about starting a journal. Dr. Markovac, who consults Medical School faculty on alternative publishing models, and Dr. Arvan decided the Biomed Central partnership offered the best of both worlds, combining the model of a traditional peer-reviewed journal with a world-renowned open access publisher.

According to the BioMed Central license agreement, all articles published in the journal will be made available under a Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (or under a Creative Commons 1.0 Public Domain Dedication waiver, if required by law). This allows anyone to freely copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format, and also to remix, transform, and build upon the material.

Dr. Arvan, emphasizes, “The University of Michigan is proud to partner with BioMed Central for the launch of Clinical Diabetes and Endocrinology. We hope that this journal will have direct influence on the research and practice within the endocrine subspecialty. The diversity and remarkable credentials of this outstanding editorial board sends a signal that the journal stands for quality in publication to match the quality that we aspire to in our clinical practice.”

Ted Hanss, Chief Information Officer, University of Michigan Medical School, adds, “We are delighted to be partnering with BioMed Central to launch this exciting new open access publication which will allow for critical medical knowledge to be disseminated worldwide without boundaries or restrictions.”

Dr. Markovac concludes, “Everything aligned between our internal Medical School plans and what BioMed Central envisioned. If this goes well, we hope to launch more open access journals for other clinical departments at the Medical School.”

For more information about the journal, open access, or MSIS Health Sciences Publishing Services, please contact Jasna Markovac at jasnam@umich.edu.

National Medical Librarians Month 2014

October is, among many other things, National Medical Librarians Month.  The Medical Library Association has over 3300 members across the United States and Canada.  Once a year we hold a national conference in cities across North America and share our contributions to the field and our collaborations with hospitals, health systems, and health sciences programs at colleges and universities.  The Medical Library Association is over 110 years old; it was founded in 1898 by four librarians and four physicians as the Association of Medical Librarians.  If you are interested in learning more about the history of the professional association, please explore the MLA Milestones page.

National Medical Library Month  from the Medical Library Association (2012)

National Medical Librarian Month from the Medical Library Association (2012)

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Suicide Prevention & Trauma on Social Media – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of October 6, 2014)

TRIGGER WARNING - Suicide Posts on WHISPER

Sunday night I participated in a very interesting chat on Twitter. It was part of the #SPSM chat, which stands for Suicide Prevention and Social Media. The chat was about an experience I had last summer. To make it overly brief, I ended up in an extended conversation with a suicidal person through an anonymous social media service, and I didn’t know what to do, how to do, or even whether to do anything. At that time, I was curious, and explored social media posts that state suicidal ideation or intent on several platforms, such as Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and so forth. Pinterest tended to say, “So CUTE I want to die” (with a few boards collecting sad stories). On Google Plus the results for “want to die” mostly brought up posts about animals in shelters scheduled for euthanasia. There were a few on each of Facebook and Twitter, but they tended to be mostly people using the phrase lightly for purposes of emphasis and drama, and more important, they rarely if ever show up in a normal Twitter stream. You have to go out explicitly hunting for them, as I did for this screenshot.

TRIGGER: Twitter Search: "want to die"

Once you shift over to the anonymous social media services, like Post-Secret, Secret, 6 Billion Secrets, and Whisper, it’s a different story. You can hardly turn around without tripping over a post that expresses some sort of suicidal thoughts or other emotional trauma, or worse, posts fantasizing about hurting other people. When I check Whisper, I’ll often see posts like those at the head of this blogpost, with timestamps of “1 minute ago” “46 seconds ago” and so on. The vulnerable posts can elicit comments ranging from heartfelt support to vicious attacks, which is a bit part of why the creator of Post-Secret shut down that app. My experience came on Whisper. Here are a couple other links showing some Whisper content.


Ashley Beckner: Whisper App Confessions: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=haTbJrwDnYM

13 Eye-Opening Confessions From Men In Abusive Relationships http://www.buzzfeed.com/rachelzarrell/13-eye-opening-confessions-about-the-male-victims-of-domesti?bftw&utm_term=4ldqpfp#u9lop

16 Heartbreaking Anonymous Secrets: The anonymity afforded by Whisper often means we get a harrowing, intimate view of people’s daily struggles. http://www.buzzfeed.com/alanwhite/16-heartbreaking-anonymous-secrets#u9lop

In last night’s Twitter chat, some of the issues that came up included:
– challenges with the ethical underpinnings of anonymous social media services;
– challenges on anonymous services to find out where the person is, gender, other identifiers for rescuers;
– the idea that calling 911 for help for a person is a breach of community standards (like ‘narcing’ in drug culture);
– geographic challenges in locating assistance when the person is in a different country;
– different cultural standards for appropriate response to suicidal intent;
– legal challenges when the service refuses to identify the anonymous suicidal user except to police in the country of origin for the service (and not in the country of residence for the suicidal person);
– and much more.

Here are some of the tweets from last night’s chat.

Radiation Oncology Journal Club (#RadOnc) – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of September 29, 2014)

Screenshot of article's abstract.

JAMA: Use of and mortality after bilateral mastectomy … http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1900512

I’ve previously mentioned medical journal clubs on Twitter. Today I wanted to show some of what happens in the real conversation. The Radiation Oncology Journal Club (#RadOnc) has a very accessible model for managing the journal club and making it easy to engage in the conversation. After all, they know how busy doctors really are, and what scheduling is like. The journal club runs over the entire weekend. The conversation isn’t exactly synchronous (same time) or asynchronous (whenever), but rather semi-synchronous, a loosely defined time period where you can gather with friends and colleagues, but people tend to wander in and out of the conversation. However, it’s an international party, so you will hear comparisons about treatment standards in different parts of the world. They’ve explicitly stated that the journal club is bilingual, English/Spanish/Español, so there’s that to make it interesting (challenging) as well. Sometimes they are lucky, and can get the authors of the paper to step in and answer questions. One of the other quirky things about doing this on Twitter is that, even though the conversation is mostly other radiation oncologists and doctors, there are interested patients who come in and ask questions or share thoughts, concerns, and insights. It can be a great educational tool on both sides!

From the National Library of Medicine: Roosevelt at NIH

I am taking a course this semester on archives and social memory and when I saw this announcement from the National Library of Medicine, I thought the blog would be a great venue to share the power of archives.

The National Library of Medicine has released this video almost 74 years after FDR spoke at the National Institutes of Health to dedicate the National Cancer Institute.

If you are interested in see more archival data from the 1940s and/or the National Library of Medicine, check their Digital Collection or YouTube channel.    And if you want to learn more about the Roosevelt family, catch the reruns of Ken Burn’s latest film, The Roosevelts: An Intimate History, on PBS.  (My parents saw it and highly recommend it.  It is on my to-watch list for winter break!)

Patients on the Right TEDMED Questions – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of September 22, 2014)

Role of the patient: How do we empower patients to make healthier decisions? What is the patient's role from his or her perspective? What is the role of healthy people (non-patients) in healthcare?

TEDMED Great Challenges: Role of the Patient (photo by Dr. Nick Dawson)

Last week, we talked about the trend toward patient engagement in events that may have previously been focused almost exclusively on medical professionals. A spin off from that rich conversation was when the patient advocates began to question what are the right questions to be asking about patient engagement. Even more impressive, TEDMED was sometimes asking if they have the right questions, so this is a conversation valued from several perspectives.

What I’m observing, however, is a sense of not being included on the part of patients, and a strong need for greater engagement by patients in the process by which TEDMED develops their questions and Great Challenges. Just in case there are those who aren’t aware of this, TEDMED has an online community space where these matters are discussed. Anyone can create an account and ID for participating in this conversation. Know someone you think should be participating? Ask they if they’ve joined, or better yet, invite them.

TEDMED: Great Challenges: http://www.tedmed.com/greatchallenges

TEDMED: Account Creation: https://www.tedmed.com/accounts/login?redirectto=%2Fgreatchallenges&ref=account-login

Here are some of the tweets from that tangential conversation, beginning with the one that started it all.

TEDMED on Patient Engagement – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of September 15, 2014)

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TEDMED 2014: Image from presentation, believed to be by Marc Koska.

At Stanford’s Medicine X event, the patient is front and center to the whole experience, an essential partner in helping to innovate in healthcare, as well as in helping to plan the event. In the week following #MedX the Healthcare Leader (#hcldr) Twitter chat also discussed the why and how of engaging patients in healthcare professional conferences with the goal of encouraging fast, relevant innovation in healthcare. Imagine my delight when the same theme cropped up AGAIN at TEDMED. The image opening this blogpost was captured from one of the presentations at TEDMED, I think one by Marc Koska, in which the discussion was about identifying the most important stakeholders for improving (revolutionizing) healthcare, and what relationships are needed among those stakeholder communities. As he kept talking, more and more lines were drawn, connecting the various groups. Ultimately, they are all connected to each other. Thinking of patients, this means patients should be actively engaged in conversations with health care providers, insurance, policy makers, device designers and manufacturers, drug companies, researchers, and so forth.

Part of the point of engaging with actual patients is that you don’t always know what they’ll say. You want to help, and you think you know what will help them, but you can’t truly KNOW until you talk with a lot of patients, to learn about different types of experiences, needs, and perspectives. Sometimes what they say can be quite surprising. Kitra Cahana was a presenter at TEDMED who described her father, Ronnie, spelling out messages with eyeblinks after a major stroke resulting in “locked in syndrome.” What was he saying? Some of the most intelligent, coherent, poetic messages describing the patient experience that I have ever encountered.

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So TEDMED asked. They’ve define patient engagement as one of the Great Challenges facing healthcare. “What is the role of the patient? How do we empower patients to make healthier decisions? What is the patient’s role from his or her perspective? What is the role of health people (non-patients) in healthcare?” Here is part of what they asked, and part of what they heard.

@JoelHigh “We have to go deeper with patient to understand their values”

@roseperson “Empower patients to make healthy decisions by advocating for policies and incentives to make healthy=easy”

@LALupusLady “Manage my chronic condition with a TEAM of HCPs, also strive to control flares”

JAMA Article: The Importance of Engaging Medical Librarians in Reviews

The informationists at the Taubman Health Sciences Library are ready and willing to collaborate with clinical faculty and staff across the health sciences schools and the health system on research and literature searches.

This article (Engaging Medical Librarians to Improve the Quality of Review Articles) from the Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA), out today, speaks directly to the value of collaborating with medical librarians and informationists.  A two page read that could provide an exponential return on investment.

Medical librarians play a central role in assisting clinicians access medical literature needed to provide patient care.4 They also can play an important role in developing high-quality narrative and systematic reviews, constructing search strategies, managing references, reviewing references for inclusion, documenting the search methodology, and contributing to the drafting of the final manuscript. Having a medical librarian closely involved ensures that the review will be thorough and its methodology reproducible. Medical librarians bring expertise to the review process based on their understanding of the medical literature, search methods, and re- view guidelines and standards. Their neutrality and expertise can help minimize bias in the review process, leading to more robust and un- biased review articles. – Excerpt from Rethlefsen, Murad, & Livingston (2014)

Rethlefsen ML, Murad M, Livingston EH. Engaging Medical Librarians to Improve the Quality of Review Articles. JAMA.2014;312(10):999-1000. doi:10.1001/jama.2014.9263.

Collaboration (2013) designed by Krisada from the thenounproject.com (CC BY 3.0)

Collaboration designed by Krisada from the thenounproject.com