Taubman Health Sciences Library History–Our Beginnings

Leading up to the re-opening of the renovated Taubman Health Sciences Library building in summer 2015, we are planning a series of blog posts highlighting aspects of the library’s history. This first post focuses on the first 50 years of the library, from its mid-nineteenth century beginnings to the turn of the 20th century.

 

University of Michigan Old Medical Building

University of Michigan Old Medical Building. Built in 1850 and pictured during the 1860s. Image source: Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan, BL000001.

 Medical School

The history of the Taubman Health Sciences Library begins with the establishment of the medical school and the early years of the University Library. The Medical Department opened in 1850, in a 3-story building on a dirt road at the edge of campus, now the east side of the Diag. The school offered a 2-year program, with five salaried professors hired to lecture and give clinical demonstrations.

In 1850, about 75 students were enrolled in the university as a whole. Medical students likely did not have a college education, but did have to provide evidence of a good moral character and enough Greek and Latin knowledge to read medical texts, as well as arrange a 3-year apprenticeship with a practicing and “respectable” doctor, according to Horace Davenport’s history of the medical school’s first 50 years.


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Concerns & Clarification on the FDA Guidelines for Social Media (#FDAsm)

FDASM: FDA on Social Media

Last Tuesday afternoon, there was a Twitter chat on the new FDA guidance on social media that was hosted by the medical librarians group (#MedLibs), but which engaged an audience that also included healthcare professionals, lawyers, and communication specialists. It was a very interesting chat that touched on concerns, assumptions, misunderstandings, clarifications, and resources. You will find many of these excerpted from the full conversation and highlighted below. First, though, here is a high level summary.

Concerns included the potentail for a “chilling effect” that might impact on education, innovation, professional and patient public communications, research and clinical trial recruitment; responsibility (who is responsible for what/when/where/how with respect to health social media communications); effectiveness of social media controls for their intended purposes and the costs/benefit assessments; the role of identity, honesty, and transparency in health social media communication; and whether the guidelines will promote inclusion or foster exclusion of relevant voices in useful conversations.

Clarifications sought: plain language summaries of the guidelines; description of the potential and expected impacts on various communities of practice, including health education and patients; the relationship and responsibilities of employers and employees in their social media identity management and communications; and the issue off-label use conversations outside of pharma entities.

Clarifications which appeared during the chat (but which are note from the FDA, and therefore not the authoritative word with respect to these issues): who is covered by the guidance; community and individual efforts to create plain language distillations of the guidance; context; and a reminder that freedom of speech does not equal freedom of consequences for that speech.

For Medical Librarians: role for medical librarians in supporting and demonstrating best practices in Twitter chats; role for medical librarians in supporting education around the FDA’s guidance for their institutions as well as for patients and the public; and a caution about medical librarians being potentially excluded from social media as part institutional image controls as well as potentially as an impact of the guidance.

Takeaways: how to format an FDA-style tweet; avoid creating branded accounts for free conversation; encourage individuals to create personal accounts that are not branded and are distinct from the brand; consider correction of health misinformation as an opportunity; avoid perception of “practicing medicine” on social media, but discussions are alright; consider commenting on the FDA draft guidelines before September 17.

In addition, the conversation included discussion of best practices for identifying tweets as representing personal opinion, as well as a rich collection of resources.

To continue reading more information on this, please see the original post at the ETechLib blog: http://etechlib.wordpress.com/2014/08/26/concerns-clarification-on-the-fda-guidelines-for-social-media-fdasm/

New Hashtag, Nursing Ethics – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of August 25, 2014)

SL09: SLUM: Nursing Class

There is never a shortage of great healthcare hashtags, chats, events, etcetera on Twitter, and new ones appear all the time. Nursing Ethics is an emerging hashtag which is a regular Twitter chat, but gained special attention over the past week with the Nursing Ethics Summit. There is a very active and engaged nursing community on Twitter, much of it centered around #NurseUp. The Twitter nursing community is of value for talking about professional concerns and sharing professional articles and information, problems and solutions, with a great deal of potential for nursing education. Here are just a few highlights from this newest addition to the nursing hashtags.

#MakeHealth was AMAZING – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of August 18, 2014)

It’s always a delight to have the opportunity to show off a University of Michigan event in these posts. It’s even more of a delight to show off an event of which I was so intimately a part, even though I have to confess I feel like I did very little and it was the community that really drove this magical event! I was just lucky to be among the core team at the front, along with the incredible Joyce Lee and Emily Hirshfeld! There are so very many incredible people who were involved I can’t possible thank them all.

One thing you’ll notice in these tweets is the range of media included — many photos and videos that may or may not display. To get a more engaging sense of the event as displayed in the tweets you may need to click through.

WANT MORE?

The #MakeHealth Fest Reveals Local Innovation

We Make Health Fest Flickr Group

If you aren’t already aware of the big event on Saturday in Palmer Commons, you might be interested in checking it out. The We Make Health Fest is a community-campus collaboration that is creating connections and opportunities to show off local creativity and innovation in making health. This is especially true at the level of personal empowerment and finding solutions for interesting problems. Just look at the speakers and exhibitors listed below!


We Make Health Fest (University of Michigan)
We Make Health Fest: http://makehealth.us/

SPEAKERS

10:30am Joyce Lee / Welcome
10:35am Jose Gomez-Marquez / Keynote
11:05am John Costik / Keynote: Hacking Diabetes
11:35am Andrew Maynard / Color My Poop Beautiful, and Other Tales of Tech Derring Do
11:55 Makers the Movie
1:05pm Matt Christensen / Linnetic: A Better Way to Monitor Asthma
1:10pm Nanci and Eilah Nanney / GREAT Gluten-Free Kitchens!
1:15pm Marc Stephens / Tech-Savvy Fitness
1:25pm Jane Berliss-Vincent / The iPad as Resuscitation Device: Notes on Assistive Tech in the Hospital Environment
1:35pm Linda Diane Feldt / There is a Free Lunch: Wildcrafting and Foraging for Food and Medicine
1:45pm Kris Kullgren / Mott Kids4Kids: Utilizing Peer Education Videos at Bedside and Beyond
1:55pm Amer Abughaida / A Manual Stair-Climbing Wheelchair
2:00pm Duane Mackey / Open Source Mosquito Trap
2:05pm Brandon McNaughton / Kitchen-Table Diagnostics with Glass Microbubbles
2:10pm James Rampton / Learning Health System – Consumer Application
2:20pm Irene Knokh / Free Educational Resources: MERLOT and beyond!
2:25pm Mike Lee / Demonstration of World Possible’s Remote Areas Community Hotspots for Education and Learning (RACHEL) Project
2:35pm Sandy Merkel / The Poke Program
2:45pm Harpreet Singh / Communication Box: Flip the Health Care Culture by T.R.U.M.P. Technique
2:55pm Michael Flynn / Fostering a sense of community in hospital lobbies with interactive public art
3:00pm Gary Olthoff / EZCarryBed Mattress Carrier Handle
3:05pm George Albercook / DIY Hearing Aids – A Model MakeHealth
3:15pm Pete Wendel / Games and User Interface Design: Thinking Differently to Affect Elderly Quality of Life
3:25pm Lia Min / In My Spectrum: A Comic about Autism Desktop
3:35pm Shawn O’Grady / 3D Printing and Rapid Prototyping
3:40pm George Albercook / Makers Answer the Call
3:45pm AJ Montpetit / Disrupting Health Care
3:55pm PF Anderson / Personalized Genomics and Closing Remarks

EXHIBITORS

10am – 12pm
IconArray.com: A Free Generator of Health Risk Graphics
Linnetic: A Better Way to Monitor Asthma
Type 1 Diabetes

10am – 1pm
Building Capacity for the Ann Arbor Sharing Economy
National Foundation for Celiac Awareness — GREAT Kitchens!
We Make Health Stories

10am – 2pm
Cardboard Challenge: #makehealth
Kitchen-Table Diagnostics with Glass Microbubbles

10am – 3pm
The Poke Program

11am – 12pm
Free Educational Resources: MERLOT and Beyond

12pm – 2pm
A Manual Stair-Climbing Wheelchair
Demonstration of World Possible’s Remote Areas Community Hotspots for Education and Learning (RACHEL) Project
Hacking Diabetes
Learning Health System – Consumer Application

1pm – 4pm
Michigan Engineered for All Libes (M-HEAL)

2pm – 4pm
Open Source Mosquito Trap

Using Twitter to Counteract Hype, Part 2 – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of August 11, 2014)

CDC Combats Ebola Hype with Twitter Chat August 8, 2014

Last week, I showed you some of the ways in which the healthcare community is using Twitter to combat hype and misinformation about Ebola. This week there is a more specific example of the same idea — how the Centers for Disease Control scheduled a Twitter chat to answer questions in public for clinicians and healthcare providers about the Ebola outbreak in Africa.

There are some surprises in this collection. Some surprising questions, some surprising answers, and sometimes the surprise is in who is doing the answering. The conversation around bleach is especially interesting. Also, notice who is retweeting what the CDC says. This is a small sampling, but many many people passing along the information, and this is important for spreading the word.

THANK YOU, CDC


Time to Comment on the NEW FDA Guidelines for Social Media Use in Healthcare

Draft Guidance for Industry on Internet/Social Media Platforms: Correcting Independent Third-Party Misinformation About Prescription Drugs and Medical Devices; Availability
Draft Guidance for Industry on Internet/Social Media Platforms: Correcting Independent Third-Party Misinformation About Prescription Drugs and Medical Devices; Availability: https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2014/06/18/2014-14221/draft-guidance-for-industry-on-internetsocial-media-platforms-correcting-independent-third-party

The FDA has released new guidelines for how social media is used in healthcare. The University of Michigan had been involved in commenting on the original call for comments on this topic, and emphasized the potential impact of any guidelines on professional medical education and healthcare education more broadly. Those comments are available here

FDA-2009-N-0441 Docket Comments, University of Michigan Public Forum: http://www.slideshare.net/umhealthscienceslibraries/fda2009n0441-docket-comments-university-of-michigan-public-forum

Recent reviewers commenting on the new policy are encouraging people to consider these guidelines in the context of FDA actions, such as recent warning letters that explicitly comment upon Facebook “likes.”

FDA Warning Letters: Zarbee's (Facebook "Likes")
FDA: Warning Letters: 2014: Zarbee’s, Inc. 6/27/14: http://www.fda.gov/iceci/enforcementactions/warningletters/2014/ucm403255.htm

Remember, these are not yet cast in stone, as we are in a period of time when it is still possible to file comments on the docket for the guidelines. How could this impact on your work? How you teach students? Clinical trial recruitment? How you connect with patients, or patients connect with you? What about the impact on uses of social media for shaping future policy and grant funding? Even if you are not currently using social media, what about the future and how it might be used?

You can read more, find more links, and information on how to comment at this blogpost by THL Emerging Technologies Informationist, Patricia Anderson.

FDA On Social Media: Time to Pay Attention, Take Two http://etechlib.wordpress.com/2014/08/01/fda-on-social-media-time-to-pay-attention-take-two/

Using Twitter to Counteract Hype (#Ebola) – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of August 4, 2014)

Ebola virionsEbola virus particles
From Wikimedia Commons: Ebola virions; Ebola virus particles

In the last week, I don’t think there has been a moment when the trending hashtags display on my Twitter page has NOT listed “Ebola.” This is in part due to the attention resulting from two American healthcare providers having been infected with the Ebola virus while providing care, and partly also from the newest update from WHO on the outbreak in West Africa, which lists over 1500 cases and almost 900 deaths. People are panicking, and the press is going wild. This is a great opportunity to show how healthcare professionals and the broader healthcare Twitter community is using the #Ebola hashtag to help alleviate concerns and moderate anxiety, by providing informed balanced reliable information. Each of the tweets included in this post is considered a popular tweet which has already been retweeted several times and/or favorited by people reading the tweet. If you want to help calm things down, you might consider retweeting or sharing some of these popular tweets on the topic.

lores Ebola Zaire CDC Photo
From Wikimedia Commons: Ebola case #3, 1976

Pubmed is LIVE on Social Media – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of July 21, 2014)

Pubmed Social Media Icons
PubMed Update: Social Media Icons Added. NLM Tech Bull. 2014 Jul-Aug;(399):b2. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/techbull/ja14/brief/ja14_pm_social_media_icons.html

Have you been straddling the fence deciding whether or not social media is “a thing” in healthcare? Well, maybe this will tip the balance. Pubmed now includes social media sharing icons at the article level, as shown in the image above. This is in addition to NIH’s own active life on social media. Unfortunately, when I was testing it out, every now and then what it shared was not the link to the article, but a link to the search strategy from which I found the articles. Hopefully, they’ll get that fixed, but usually it was good. Here’s what it looks like when sharing something to Twitter.

Pubmed Social Media Sharing Example: Twitter

In honor of this noteworthy change, I thought I’d divert from actual hashtags to seeing what people are sharing from Pubmed this week. If you really want hashtags, take a look at what hashtags they are ADDING to the posts, since Pubmed doesn’t automatically add any.

Trust & Health Information in Social Media – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of July 14, 2014)

BBC Radio4: Reith Lectures 2002: Onora O'Neill, Trust

The question of trust is not a new one — who we trust, how we trust, why we trust. All of these are known to be critical in healthcare, even more so now that we have the Internet and social media. In last’s evening’s #HCSM Twitter chat, a group of patients and doctors debated portions of this question. No new answers or solutions appeared, but there were some provocative statements and perspectives.

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