#MakeHealth was AMAZING – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of August 18, 2014)

It’s always a delight to have the opportunity to show off a University of Michigan event in these posts. It’s even more of a delight to show off an event of which I was so intimately a part, even though I have to confess I feel like I did very little and it was the community that really drove this magical event! I was just lucky to be among the core team at the front, along with the incredible Joyce Lee and Emily Hirshfeld! There are so very many incredible people who were involved I can’t possible thank them all.

One thing you’ll notice in these tweets is the range of media included — many photos and videos that may or may not display. To get a more engaging sense of the event as displayed in the tweets you may need to click through.

WANT MORE?

The #MakeHealth Fest Reveals Local Innovation

We Make Health Fest Flickr Group

If you aren’t already aware of the big event on Saturday in Palmer Commons, you might be interested in checking it out. The We Make Health Fest is a community-campus collaboration that is creating connections and opportunities to show off local creativity and innovation in making health. This is especially true at the level of personal empowerment and finding solutions for interesting problems. Just look at the speakers and exhibitors listed below!


We Make Health Fest (University of Michigan)
We Make Health Fest: http://makehealth.us/

SPEAKERS

10:30am Joyce Lee / Welcome
10:35am Jose Gomez-Marquez / Keynote
11:05am John Costik / Keynote: Hacking Diabetes
11:35am Andrew Maynard / Color My Poop Beautiful, and Other Tales of Tech Derring Do
11:55 Makers the Movie
1:05pm Matt Christensen / Linnetic: A Better Way to Monitor Asthma
1:10pm Nanci and Eilah Nanney / GREAT Gluten-Free Kitchens!
1:15pm Marc Stephens / Tech-Savvy Fitness
1:25pm Jane Berliss-Vincent / The iPad as Resuscitation Device: Notes on Assistive Tech in the Hospital Environment
1:35pm Linda Diane Feldt / There is a Free Lunch: Wildcrafting and Foraging for Food and Medicine
1:45pm Kris Kullgren / Mott Kids4Kids: Utilizing Peer Education Videos at Bedside and Beyond
1:55pm Amer Abughaida / A Manual Stair-Climbing Wheelchair
2:00pm Duane Mackey / Open Source Mosquito Trap
2:05pm Brandon McNaughton / Kitchen-Table Diagnostics with Glass Microbubbles
2:10pm James Rampton / Learning Health System – Consumer Application
2:20pm Irene Knokh / Free Educational Resources: MERLOT and beyond!
2:25pm Mike Lee / Demonstration of World Possible’s Remote Areas Community Hotspots for Education and Learning (RACHEL) Project
2:35pm Sandy Merkel / The Poke Program
2:45pm Harpreet Singh / Communication Box: Flip the Health Care Culture by T.R.U.M.P. Technique
2:55pm Michael Flynn / Fostering a sense of community in hospital lobbies with interactive public art
3:00pm Gary Olthoff / EZCarryBed Mattress Carrier Handle
3:05pm George Albercook / DIY Hearing Aids – A Model MakeHealth
3:15pm Pete Wendel / Games and User Interface Design: Thinking Differently to Affect Elderly Quality of Life
3:25pm Lia Min / In My Spectrum: A Comic about Autism Desktop
3:35pm Shawn O’Grady / 3D Printing and Rapid Prototyping
3:40pm George Albercook / Makers Answer the Call
3:45pm AJ Montpetit / Disrupting Health Care
3:55pm PF Anderson / Personalized Genomics and Closing Remarks

EXHIBITORS

10am – 12pm
IconArray.com: A Free Generator of Health Risk Graphics
Linnetic: A Better Way to Monitor Asthma
Type 1 Diabetes

10am – 1pm
Building Capacity for the Ann Arbor Sharing Economy
National Foundation for Celiac Awareness — GREAT Kitchens!
We Make Health Stories

10am – 2pm
Cardboard Challenge: #makehealth
Kitchen-Table Diagnostics with Glass Microbubbles

10am – 3pm
The Poke Program

11am – 12pm
Free Educational Resources: MERLOT and Beyond

12pm – 2pm
A Manual Stair-Climbing Wheelchair
Demonstration of World Possible’s Remote Areas Community Hotspots for Education and Learning (RACHEL) Project
Hacking Diabetes
Learning Health System – Consumer Application

1pm – 4pm
Michigan Engineered for All Libes (M-HEAL)

2pm – 4pm
Open Source Mosquito Trap

Using Twitter to Counteract Hype, Part 2 – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of August 11, 2014)

CDC Combats Ebola Hype with Twitter Chat August 8, 2014

Last week, I showed you some of the ways in which the healthcare community is using Twitter to combat hype and misinformation about Ebola. This week there is a more specific example of the same idea — how the Centers for Disease Control scheduled a Twitter chat to answer questions in public for clinicians and healthcare providers about the Ebola outbreak in Africa.

There are some surprises in this collection. Some surprising questions, some surprising answers, and sometimes the surprise is in who is doing the answering. The conversation around bleach is especially interesting. Also, notice who is retweeting what the CDC says. This is a small sampling, but many many people passing along the information, and this is important for spreading the word.

THANK YOU, CDC


Time to Comment on the NEW FDA Guidelines for Social Media Use in Healthcare

Draft Guidance for Industry on Internet/Social Media Platforms: Correcting Independent Third-Party Misinformation About Prescription Drugs and Medical Devices; Availability
Draft Guidance for Industry on Internet/Social Media Platforms: Correcting Independent Third-Party Misinformation About Prescription Drugs and Medical Devices; Availability: https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2014/06/18/2014-14221/draft-guidance-for-industry-on-internetsocial-media-platforms-correcting-independent-third-party

The FDA has released new guidelines for how social media is used in healthcare. The University of Michigan had been involved in commenting on the original call for comments on this topic, and emphasized the potential impact of any guidelines on professional medical education and healthcare education more broadly. Those comments are available here

FDA-2009-N-0441 Docket Comments, University of Michigan Public Forum: http://www.slideshare.net/umhealthscienceslibraries/fda2009n0441-docket-comments-university-of-michigan-public-forum

Recent reviewers commenting on the new policy are encouraging people to consider these guidelines in the context of FDA actions, such as recent warning letters that explicitly comment upon Facebook “likes.”

FDA Warning Letters: Zarbee's (Facebook "Likes")
FDA: Warning Letters: 2014: Zarbee’s, Inc. 6/27/14: http://www.fda.gov/iceci/enforcementactions/warningletters/2014/ucm403255.htm

Remember, these are not yet cast in stone, as we are in a period of time when it is still possible to file comments on the docket for the guidelines. How could this impact on your work? How you teach students? Clinical trial recruitment? How you connect with patients, or patients connect with you? What about the impact on uses of social media for shaping future policy and grant funding? Even if you are not currently using social media, what about the future and how it might be used?

You can read more, find more links, and information on how to comment at this blogpost by THL Emerging Technologies Informationist, Patricia Anderson.

FDA On Social Media: Time to Pay Attention, Take Two http://etechlib.wordpress.com/2014/08/01/fda-on-social-media-time-to-pay-attention-take-two/

Using Twitter to Counteract Hype (#Ebola) – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of August 4, 2014)

Ebola virionsEbola virus particles
From Wikimedia Commons: Ebola virions; Ebola virus particles

In the last week, I don’t think there has been a moment when the trending hashtags display on my Twitter page has NOT listed “Ebola.” This is in part due to the attention resulting from two American healthcare providers having been infected with the Ebola virus while providing care, and partly also from the newest update from WHO on the outbreak in West Africa, which lists over 1500 cases and almost 900 deaths. People are panicking, and the press is going wild. This is a great opportunity to show how healthcare professionals and the broader healthcare Twitter community is using the #Ebola hashtag to help alleviate concerns and moderate anxiety, by providing informed balanced reliable information. Each of the tweets included in this post is considered a popular tweet which has already been retweeted several times and/or favorited by people reading the tweet. If you want to help calm things down, you might consider retweeting or sharing some of these popular tweets on the topic.

lores Ebola Zaire CDC Photo
From Wikimedia Commons: Ebola case #3, 1976

Pubmed is LIVE on Social Media – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of July 21, 2014)

Pubmed Social Media Icons
PubMed Update: Social Media Icons Added. NLM Tech Bull. 2014 Jul-Aug;(399):b2. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/techbull/ja14/brief/ja14_pm_social_media_icons.html

Have you been straddling the fence deciding whether or not social media is “a thing” in healthcare? Well, maybe this will tip the balance. Pubmed now includes social media sharing icons at the article level, as shown in the image above. This is in addition to NIH’s own active life on social media. Unfortunately, when I was testing it out, every now and then what it shared was not the link to the article, but a link to the search strategy from which I found the articles. Hopefully, they’ll get that fixed, but usually it was good. Here’s what it looks like when sharing something to Twitter.

Pubmed Social Media Sharing Example: Twitter

In honor of this noteworthy change, I thought I’d divert from actual hashtags to seeing what people are sharing from Pubmed this week. If you really want hashtags, take a look at what hashtags they are ADDING to the posts, since Pubmed doesn’t automatically add any.

Trust & Health Information in Social Media – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of July 14, 2014)

BBC Radio4: Reith Lectures 2002: Onora O'Neill, Trust

The question of trust is not a new one — who we trust, how we trust, why we trust. All of these are known to be critical in healthcare, even more so now that we have the Internet and social media. In last’s evening’s #HCSM Twitter chat, a group of patients and doctors debated portions of this question. No new answers or solutions appeared, but there were some provocative statements and perspectives.

Continue reading

Fatigue in Healthcare – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of July 7, 2014)

Asleep in the Library

Each week the Healthcare Leaders chat (#HCLDR) is fabulous, covering relevant fascinating topics of great interest to me. I can’t highlight them every week, but I am often tempted to do so. This one was huge — how do we manage fatigue when it impacts on doctors, nurses, residents, students?

Keeping Patients in the Dark – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of June 30, 2014)

The legal and ethical implications of KEEPING PATIENTS IN THE DARK
Summer Institute for Informed Patient Choice: The legal and ethical implications of keeping patients in the dark: http://siipc.org/

You shape your Twitter experience through who you choose to follow. Everything else derives from this — the tweets you see, the suggestions for people to follow, the hashtags listed as trending, all of it. For me, by far the majority of the people I follow are somehow connected to healthcare. Last week the hashtag that was vibrating through my Twitter feed was #SIIP14, which turned out to be for a biannual event on patient choice held at Dartmouth College. From what I was seeing, it sure looked as if they had some exceptional speakers and great conversations. There was also ONE particular tweet and slide that seemed to sum up the most important thoughts of the conference, on how to tell the difference between “informed consent” and “shared decision making.” Trust me, if the image doesn’t show up in the embedded tweet below, you really need to click through and see this one.

The discussion centered around that one tweet was rather insightful, especially with respect to how “informed consent” may be perceived by actual patients. Here are just a few selections (excluding some of the strong language that accompanied people’s passionate responses).

That side conversation is, however, only part of the exceptional thoughts that circulated through #SIIPC14. Historic context, overdiagnosis, the child’s view of the doctor, unwanted surgeries, access to information and research articles, respecting the accommodation needs of patients who attend healthcare events (and when is the doctor a patient?), with much more.

Note – in this image, the doctor is the one with their back to the rest of the room, typing away furiously on the computer.


ABOUT INFORMED CONSENT IN SURGERY


INFORMATION ACCESS AND PATIENTS


ACCOMMODATIONS


OTHER HIGH POINTS

Make Health Fest Coming August 16!

Detroit Maker Faire 2013#UMSIMakerfest !!!Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013
Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2014Detroit Maker Faire 2013
Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2014Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2014Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013

We Make Health Fest
Saturday, Aug 16th, 2014
University of Michigan
Palmer Commons, Great Lakes Rooms

Short Description
“A collaborative event for a local and virtual community interested in health, technology, and participatory design. Join us for a full day of health themed design and maker activities!”

Longer Description
Many types of events are being triggered by the creativity of the Maker Movement — maker faires, mini-maker faires, maker camps, maker festivals, maker fests and makerfests, make-a-thons and createathons (also spelled makeathon or makethon), open make events, maker madness events, maker shows — and they come in all sizes, flavors, and themes. What does that mean? Think of it as a mash-up of science fair PLUS Hands On Museum or Exploratorium PLUS do it yourself! It’s all about learning and creating and problemsolving through a combination of Show+Tell+Do! Here at the University of Michigan, many people on campus are partnering on taking the “maker culture” energy and applying it through a lens focused on health to promote participatory and collaborative strategies in healthcare. Come, have fun, learn, make stuff, but more than that, meet other interesting and creative people who are interested in using what they have, know, and can do to Make Health!

Learn More!

Make Health: http://makehealth.us/
Twitter: @MakeHealthUM
Google Plus: Make Health UM

A project of HealthDesignBy.Us
Twitter: @HealthByUs
Blog: Introducing @HealthByUs

We Make Health